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Home Modifications: From Falls to Freedom

After my multiple sclerosis diagnosis in 1997, I knew that I would be faced with obstacles in my life, but didn't know when they would occur or what they would be. I was a school teacher and coach, a former college athlete and father of two daughters. In my mind…I was still invincible.

In 1999 my son was born, and like most fathers I still remember dreaming of the day I would get to run alongside him, teaching him how to ride his bike. Four years later that day came. I placed my hand on his back and together we took off down the street ready for his first ride…or so I thought. My legs simply would not move. My son fell over on his bike and my strong legs could not run to help him. That was the moment I realized that MS was going to affect me more than I had anticipated. It had slowed me down and tainted a moment I had looked forward to for years...

Longing for the bluebells

They cover roadside meadows like a carpet from late March to mid-April, these wildflowers that are Texas’ official state flower. Bluebells are a welcome temporary break from the cold, wind and slush still clinging to life back home on the Plains. And the locals in and around Fredericksburg, Texas, know it. You can buy towels, sweatshirts, Christmas ornaments, note cards—well, just about anything, really—with bluebells on them. For me, it’s enough to drive with the windows rolled down and drink in the colors. And driving in the comfort of your own car is a big MS equalizer...

Seaside

I was diagnosed with MS in 2010 and it was a turning point in not only my life, but also my marriage. The first few months were full of uncertainty and tears but the one constant was (and continues to be) my amazing wife Meg. In the first year, I lost more than some people do in a lifetime of battling MS. With every flare up the fear of what I might lose next is always present. MS has changed so many things in our lives, but we will not let traveling be one of those things. As I transition into secondary progressive MS, Meg and I are ready to document and share our journey. And with our 8th Anniversary just around the corner I can’t help but look back...

MS, Relationships and Intimacy: An interview with Dr. Peggy Crawford (Part 1)

We recently sat down with Dr. Peggy Crawford to discuss relationships and intimacy. As a health psychologist, Dr. Crawford has worked with individuals and families with multiple sclerosis for the past 25 years. She was a member of the staff at the Mellen Center for Research and Treatment of MS at the Cleveland Clinic and then a faculty member in the Department of Neurology at the University of Cincinnati. Over the years, Dr. Crawford has been actively involved with the National MS Society as a presenter, consultant and committee member and with CAN DO MS as a member of the program staff. In your experience working with people with MS, what do you see as the greatest challenges that couples face when it comes to MS and intimacy?...

Paving the way for MS research

It all started 30 years ago when I noticed that my vision deteriorated suddenly. I had always had 20/20 vision, so I became acutely aware that something was wrong when my TV started looking blurry, I mixed up my colors and my depth perception was off. Unnerved, I sought out a doctor’s opinion. I was relieved when he ruled out a brain tumor, but I was left with no definitive answers. As time passed, my vision gradually improved, but I started noticing other seemingly unrelated issues. Occasional muscle spasms would come and go when I wrote. I was getting much more tired during my weekly golf outings. Again, I set off to see my doctor but he dismissed both of these symptoms as dehydration...

With feet firmly planted

Everyone said it’d be easy. Cruising, that is. Ships are handicapped accessible, right? So in the fog following my primary progressive multiple sclerosis diagnosis, last winter, I called the travel agents at Expedia, eager to escape our snowy winter and icy sidewalks. I’d cruised-toured just seven months earlier, a 40th birthday trip-of-a-lifetime to Alaska, and though I was undiagnosed, my PPMS had already taken most of the feeling from my legs. I clung to my friend Lindsay as we hiked, visited a sled-dog camp and went whitewater rafting on the Mendenhall River. Now, six months later, my disease had progressed even more, and I was using a walker and scooter to get around. Would cruising really be as easy as I thought? ...

Helping Others can be Healing

For the last few years, I have been making Rice Krispies treats and giving them to others. Although I am a pretty good cook, I have been drawn to make these easy cereal and marshmallow treats with rice cereal or corn flakes, and molding them into seasonal shapes. (They are, after all, gluten free!) For the Super Bowl, I make footballs. There will be flowers for Spring, Autumn pumpkins, candy corn shapes for Halloween, wreaths for Christmas, and right now, I am trying to design something that looks like a ground hog for our annual Ground Hog Day celebration. I have posted pictures of my creations on social media. My sister teases that my fixation with these sweet creations is an “addiction” and suggests I need an intervention because I “can’t stop anytime I want to.”...

Build with what you have

Building with LEGOs often results in an interesting quandary: the more one builds, the fewer pieces you have left in the collection, no matter how carefully they might be organized for easy retrieval. Living with a chronic, progressive, debilitating disease like multiple sclerosis is a lot like that. It can be described as “the gift that keeps on taking.” Ones strength, cognitive resources, coordination and stamina are all taken away slowly but surely…sometimes even quite abruptly...

A journey by plates

My husband tightens his back the moment we step inside Pig in a Fur Coat. The name of this Madison, Wisconsin, restaurant had raised some worry for him before we arrived. Who names a restaurant Pig in a Fur Coat? And what exactly does that mean? Now, seeing a long, high-top communal table in the middle of the dining room, his uneasiness turns to worry for two reasons...

The Wahls Protocol: An Interview with Dr. Terry Wahls

We recently sat down with Dr. Terry Wahls to discuss diet and MS. Dr. Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa and a staff physician at the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Hospital, where she teaches medical students and resident physicians, sees patients in traumatic brain injury and therapeutic lifestyle clinics with complex chronic health problems that often include multiple autoimmune disorders, and conducts clinical trials. She also lives with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, and has personally found great benefit in treating her MS through a specific program she calls the Wahls Protocol™...

Anyone Got the Holiday Blues?

So, the holidays are approaching fast. There are presents to buy, friends and relatives to see, get-togethers to plan or attend, and meals to prepare or share. No wonder many of us greet this season with a mixture of excitement and panic – it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. And for anyone living with the overpowering fatigue of MS, just the thought of all this activity can be exhausting. For some people the pressure to feel jolly, festive, social and grateful can have the opposite effect – leading to a whopping case of the holiday blues. We’ve all had them at one time or another, but MS can sometimes bring on those blues with a vengeance, particularly when MS symptoms make everything a little less fun and a little more challenging.
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