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Thriving in the Face of Adversity

When I was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis it felt as though my world had been turned upside down. At the age of 25 I had a very clear idea of what my future held, and where I was going. MS threatened to take all of that away from me, and I quickly decided that I would not let it. At first there were plenty of people telling me what I could no longer do, and that I should give up on my ambitions. But I disagreed. I sought out others who strived to make the best out of life and to make a difference despite their disabilities. I ran across so many inspirational people and communities, and soon began to feel invigorated and ready to fight.

I am a nurse, and it just so happens that neurology has always been my passion. When I was diagnosed with MS, it was really eye opening to be on the receiving end of healthcare, instead of being the provider. I realized that I now had a unique opportunity to have a positive impact on others living with MS, and I set out to do just that. I became an MS certified nurse just six month after being diagnosed with MS myself, and I began to work for my own neurologist. Currently I am finishing graduate school, and focusing mainly on writing and educating people about MS through my own site, JustKeepSmyelin.com, and several other websites and publications...

Fatigue

Fatigue: how many of you can get through the next few paragraphs without nodding off? Probably not this guy. When I start sharing all the wonderful symptoms that MS throws my way, so many people want to skip over fatigue and go right to the numbness. Most folks have a pretty good idea of what the word "fatigue" means and how it feels in general. But for me, using that word to describe the kind of exhaustion I experience doesn’t seem specific or accurate enough. When that tired sets in, I can’t just wait it out. It's not like being worn out from a workout, where you can recover with a few hours of rest. While I’ve learned that certain things can make the tired come on strong, it can be hard to predict when it’s going to slap me in the face next. A trip to the grocery store, or just a day out with the fam can be pretty good precursors to having a day of the sleeps. Sometimes for no good reason, I will nod off at the dinner table. Once those eyelids get heavy, it’s lights out. There are even days when I think my fatigue might border on narcolepsy...

Progressive MS: Looking for answers NOW

People who live with progressive MS have many questions, but one I hear often is, “When will there be treatment options for me?” Based on what I saw and heard at last week’s AAN, I’m pleased to report that researchers from around the world are making important progress toward treatments and therapies for people living with progressive MS. Several groups presented results or updates from large, ongoing studies involving people living with primary-progressive MS: one, a study of oral laquinimod, an experimental immunomodulator,  in 375 people with primary-progressive MS which recently began recruitment ; second, a clinical trial of oral ibudilast, an anti-inflammatory enzyme used in Japan, recruiting 250 people with primary- or secondary-progressive MS; and third, a study of ocrelizumab – an antibody cousin of rituximab delivered by infusion – in 740 people with primary-progressive MS that has completed enrollment. No results are available yet, but some should be next year, and it’s encouraging to see that these trials are getting under way. I hope the findings provide us with new treatment approaches for people with progressive MS. (Abstracts # P7.210, P7.017) ...

MS Repair: Rapidly moving out of the lab and into people

When I was in the lab, my research focused largely on using mouse models of MS to test concepts that couldn’t be explored in people yet. Studies presented at this week’s AAN meeting are making it clear how far research has advanced since that time. Case in point: I never would have thought just a few years ago that I would be writing about myelin repair in people, not mice. So it was pretty exciting to see a presentation Wednesday evening showing the first results of a clinical trial of the myelin repair strategy called anti-LINGO, which is being developed by Biogen. This study involved giving this IV infusion or a placebo every 4 weeks for 20 weeks to 82 people who had experienced their first episode of optic neuritis. Optic neuritis involves inflammation of the nerve that connects to the eye, and it’s often one of the first signs of MS...

The plot thickens on diet and MS

To think that you might be able to change the course of disease, or at least relieve symptoms, by eating or not eating specific types of food is enticing. However, “the proof is in the pudding,” scientifically speaking, since studying diet is challenging. That’s why it’s been exciting to see how many researchers are trying to do just that at this week’s AAN Meeting. Diet and MS has been the subject of numerous platform talks and poster sessions, showing that clinicians and researchers are asking the same questions we hear so often from people living with MS. In a small study, Dr. Rocco Totaro and a team from the University of L’Aquila in Italy tested whether a six-week diet that was low in saturated animal fats, and high in antioxidants, would be associated with positive changes in body composition and fatigue in 17 people with relapsing-remitting MS. In their study, the percentage of body fat decreased, and fatigue as measured by a clinical scale lessened significantly as well. We need more and larger studies like this, to show how diet may impact symptoms that affect the lives of people with MS. What does it mean for you now? A healthy diet certainly can’t hurt, and it may even help both MS and general health. (Abstract P2.211) ...

Finding faster, easier ways to measure MS

When I was a lab researcher, it was all about digging deeper to find a specific scientific answer. But when it comes to helping people cope with their MS right now, we need to be able to find answers that don’t require so much digging. Emerging technologies and strategies are beginning to allow us to measure and predict the disease and its effects, and take stock of how treatments are working, without making people endure yet another invasive test. Now I find myself at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) meeting in Washington, DC.  It’s been fascinating to hear about the many clinicians and scientists who are working to devise quick tests to detect MS activity and damage – often before there are any outward signs that the individual or doctor can see...

Thumbs Up

One of the hidden blessings of living with multiple sclerosis is how much more time I’m able to spend at home with my family. There are no long hours at the office nor cross-country business trips that keep me away for days or weeks at a time. But within that good fortune is a difficult paradox to navigate: I’m here, but technically, I’m not always *really* here...

Home Modifications: From Falls to Freedom

After my multiple sclerosis diagnosis in 1997, I knew that I would be faced with obstacles in my life, but didn't know when they would occur or what they would be. I was a school teacher and coach, a former college athlete and father of two daughters. In my mind…I was still invincible. In 1999 my son was born, and like most fathers I still remember dreaming of the day I would get to run alongside him, teaching him how to ride his bike. Four years later that day came. I placed my hand on his back and together we took off down the street ready for his first ride…or so I thought. My legs simply would not move. My son fell over on his bike and my strong legs could not run to help him. That was the moment I realized that MS was going to affect me more than I had anticipated. It had slowed me down and tainted a moment I had looked forward to for years...

Longing for the bluebells

They cover roadside meadows like a carpet from late March to mid-April, these wildflowers that are Texas’ official state flower. Bluebells are a welcome temporary break from the cold, wind and slush still clinging to life back home on the Plains. And the locals in and around Fredericksburg, Texas, know it. You can buy towels, sweatshirts, Christmas ornaments, note cards—well, just about anything, really—with bluebells on them. For me, it’s enough to drive with the windows rolled down and drink in the colors. And driving in the comfort of your own car is a big MS equalizer...

Seaside

I was diagnosed with MS in 2010 and it was a turning point in not only my life, but also my marriage. The first few months were full of uncertainty and tears but the one constant was (and continues to be) my amazing wife Meg. In the first year, I lost more than some people do in a lifetime of battling MS. With every flare up the fear of what I might lose next is always present. MS has changed so many things in our lives, but we will not let traveling be one of those things. As I transition into secondary progressive MS, Meg and I are ready to document and share our journey. And with our 8th Anniversary just around the corner I can’t help but look back...

MS, Relationships and Intimacy: An interview with Dr. Peggy Crawford (Part 1)

We recently sat down with Dr. Peggy Crawford to discuss relationships and intimacy. As a health psychologist, Dr. Crawford has worked with individuals and families with multiple sclerosis for the past 25 years. She was a member of the staff at the Mellen Center for Research and Treatment of MS at the Cleveland Clinic and then a faculty member in the Department of Neurology at the University of Cincinnati. Over the years, Dr. Crawford has been actively involved with the National MS Society as a presenter, consultant and committee member and with CAN DO MS as a member of the program staff. In your experience working with people with MS, what do you see as the greatest challenges that couples face when it comes to MS and intimacy?...
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