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Addressing the Drug Price Crisis

Blog Summary

As the founder and co-chair of the House Prescription Drug Task Force — the only group of Members of Congress dedicated to addressing the drug price crisis — I am committed to advancing legislative and regulatory solutions to lower the cost of prescription drugs. Before I signed the pledge, I was already working to make medications, including multiple sclerosis medications, more affordable. We have made many strides in research and treatment, but an unaffordable drug is 100 percent ineffective.

The National MS Society is a strong ally in addressing the problems of accessing medications, including rising drug prices. With nearly a 400 percent increase in the price of multiple sclerosis medications from 2004 to today, the MS Society’s initiative to make medications accessible comes at a critical time. Rising prices are about more than just one CEO, one drug manufacturer, or one drug.  Across the board we are seeing increases that put treatment out of reach of too many...

MS Symptoms: Researchers Look for Life-Changing Breakthroughs

Blog Summary

Stopping the effects of even one MS symptom can be a life-changing breakthrough for an individual with MS. I’m encouraged by the many strategies I heard about at ECTRIMS and its companion meeting, Rehabilitation in MS (RIMS), and am hopeful that they can soon be put into action to change the lives of people with MS.Fatigue – Dr. Vincent de Groot (Vu University Medical Center, Amsterdam) reported results from three clinical trials, each testing a different strategy to see if it could lessen fatigue over 16 weeks in approximately 90 people with MS: aerobic training, cognitive behavioral therapy, and energy conservation management.  Only cognitive behavioral therapy effectively reduced severe fatigue in this short-term study. We know that psychological interventions are a part of managing fatigue, and these results certainly support that...

Research News on Secondary Progressive MS from ECTRIMS

Blog Summary

​Greetings from London, England, on the final day of the very busy ECTRIMS meeting. There have been more than 1500 research study results presented over the last few days. If anyone wants to see the depth and breadth of the research, the abstracts (summaries of conference presentations) are freely available here. Also, I hope you’ll catch other blogs by my colleagues related to HSCT, progressive MS, gut microbiome and coming up on Monday, symptoms and rehab solutions.   Beyond formal presentations, I think the best part of conferences like this one are the hallway conversations and spontaneous meetings that often lead to new collaborations and ultimately, new breakthroughs. At a conference as focused as ECTRIMS, the exchanges are, “all MS, all the time.” ...

From ECTRIMS: New Results on Gut Bacteria and MS

Blog Summary

The ECTRIMS meeting has been a great place to connect with researchers on what’s truly exciting in MS research. I’ve especially enjoyed hearing about an area of investigation that is moving forward quickly – from initial observations toward treatments or solutions for people with MS. From what I've heard this week, researchers who are looking at the gut microbiome and its role in the MS immune attack are doing just that.    Drs. Yan Wang, Lloyd Kasper and colleagues from Dartmouth Medical School and Eastern Washington University built on previous work, which had shown that modulating gut bacteria during MS-like disease in mice induced specific immune cells (called Bregs – or regulatory B cells), and these Bregs reduced disease severity...

ECTRIMS 2016: Bone Marrow Transplantation (HSCT)

Blog Summary

It’s nighttime here in London, England after the first full day of ECTRIMS – the European Committee for Treatment and Research in MS. This meeting is the world’s largest gathering of MS researchers in the world, with more than 8,000 clinical and research professionals from across the globe, including many Society-funded researchers and fellows, meeting to share their cutting-edge research findings, to network and collaborate.   It was a jam-packed day of science!  For this blog, I want to share my impressions of a staged debate that was focused on the topic of hematopoietic (bone marrow) stem cell transplantation – HSCT for short...

Studies advance emotional and cognitive health in MS

Blog Summary

Finding solutions that advance emotional wellness and cognitive function can make every aspect of living with MS better. As a clinical psychologist who has treated people living with this disease, I find it heartening to see how researchers presenting this week at the American Academy of Neurology’s Annual Meeting are propelling this search forward. Here is just a small sample of their work. (Links are included to abstracts on the AAN site - access is free.) Let’s start with cognition – half or more of all people with MS will experience cognitive issues at some point. The fact that there is such a thing called “cognitive rehabilitation” rightfully suggests that there are options open to many that may help improve cognitive function. For example, Dr. Leigh Charvet and colleagues at New York University Langone Medical Center and the State University of New York at Stony Brook tested a computer-based cognitive training program in 135 people with MS. Of this group, 71 people used the training program – a series of brain-training games that are continuously adapted to keep the individual challenged – and 64 played regular video games for one hour per day, five days per week, over 12 weeks. Although the “placebo” video game group logged more playing time, those in the training group showed significantly greater improvement in cognitive function, as shown by a number of neuropsychological tests. I hope further testing makes this and similar programs easily accessible for improving cognition in MS...

Me and my "happy pill"

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Oh, I remember. In my 20's, losing sight in my right eye, tingling in my hands. In my early 30's, unable to taste food, numbness on my right side. Then at 38, vertigo, numbness from my head to my foot only on my right side, slurred speech. Finally a diagnosis: multiple sclerosis. I couldn't get a disease that was easier to spell?! I saw one of the best neurologists in NYC who told me that what I had experienced in the past and what I was experiencing now were symptoms of MS. Were there any treatments? Yes.  Was I going to inject myself? "No way." ...

#WhenYourParentHasMS You Stand Strong for MS Research

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From a young age, I have been interested in the science behind my mother’s multiple sclerosis diagnosis. I knew that I wanted to be part of the medical community. After many years working in the hospital during my undergraduate career, as an emergency medical technician, as well as shadowing neurosurgeons and performing research during my master’s program, I chose the bench (research) over bedside (treating patients). At that time, a majority of therapies targeted symptoms, not the source, of MS, and there were no therapies available to treat progressive MS. So, I have researched neurodegeneration and repair in the brain; specifically myelin repair.  In July, I started as a National MS Society research fellow at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in the lab of Stephen D. Miller, PhD. In addition to my focus on myelin repair, as a neuroimmunologist, I have the opportunity to pursue selective immune suppression. Ideally, selective immune suppression will lead to decreased (or even absence of) relapses, and myelin repair will mean the ability to repair damage.  As neurodegeneration underlies MS, effective disease-modifying therapies need to both regulate the immune system and promote restoration of neuronal function, including remyelination. Soon, I hope to be able to move from pre-clinical therapeutic trials into patient trials – and improve peoples’ quality of life in all stages of MS...

A city of nurturing

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The server at Chester’s Kitchen and Bar looks at my tired face with concern and asks sympathetically, “Did you have a lot of appointments today?” That question might seem odd anywhere else but here. This bustling,upscale restaurant draws crowds for its perfect rotisserie chicken, its locally sourced and inspired dishes and its playful bar and dessert menus. But in this location, the query makes perfect sense. Chester’s stands directly across the street from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota...

The Wahls Protocol: An Interview with Dr. Terry Wahls

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We recently sat down with Dr. Terry Wahls to discuss diet and MS. Dr. Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa and a staff physician at the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Hospital, where she teaches medical students and resident physicians, sees patients in traumatic brain injury and therapeutic lifestyle clinics with complex chronic health problems that often include multiple autoimmune disorders, and conducts clinical trials. She also lives with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, and has personally found great benefit in treating her MS through a specific program she calls the Wahls Protocol™...

Marijuana & MS: An interview with Dr. Robert Fox

Blog Summary

This month, we sat down with Dr. John DeLuca and Dr. Robert Fox to discuss your questions about marijuana and MS, as part of our new Discussion of the Month feature. Read our interview with Dr. Fox of the Cleveland Clinic below. Our interview on marijuana and cognition with Dr. DeLuca can be found here...