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  • carhayes
    Hello, MS does run in my family however I am only 24yrs old. I haven't really ever spent time thinking I may actually have MS systems until this past week when I finally got fed up with the blanking out and balance issues. Anything that may have been signs I would always tell myself it's just my sever depression I have. Today I finally went in for testing and MRI will be Monday. I'm worried now that I may actually be showing signs from watching family members go thru it. I came here for support. Do y'all think I'm too young to actually have MS? These are my symptoms and some are past 6 months, some for years:
    symptoms have been: 
     
    - Dizziness
    - Balance issues
    - Forget what I'm doing when I'm even doing it. Completely forget multiple times a day and I have to really try to collect my thoughts again.
    - Tremors
    - Recent horrible migraines
    - Dropping stuff constantly, numb hands

    Thank you for everyones support and help!!!
  • kayrmac
    Hey there !  it's unfortunate to say but you can't put an age on MS. MS also runs in my family with many members diagnosed at the age 27 and up. I myself was diagnosed at the age of 17. Hopefully it's nothing xx :)
  • johnjr1964
    Any type of medical testing or diagnosis can be scary and that is perfectly normal. The important thing is to get a diagnosis and get on a path to wellness as soon as possible . No one is going to tell you that you have MS Immediately. You'll go through a series of blood work to rule everything else out first. Typically followed by evoke potential tests, an MRI, maybe even a spinal tap. Then, you have to have at least two separate episodes or what we call attacks without any fever, infection , virus present that are typical in MS events.. Every time I went for tests prescriptions were written as possible ms, probable ms, and finally ms. It took around one year to be diagnosed with the RRMS variety. Then, you begin the process of choosing a drug to minimize effects of MS attacks. As another person stated, age really doesn't factor into the disease. Some people present early, some present latere etc. I was 42. No one should offer any opinions on your symptoms or tell you it sounds likeMS unless they are an md. You don't need to be worried any more than you already are. Take very good notes as to when you have these symptoms as to when, where on your body, how long, etc. the more info you have the better for a doc to diagnose what is going on with you. Eat healthy. Minimize processed foods. Exercise.stretch, meditate, do yoga. A clear mind free of stress will help everything going on in your body. Best of luck and don't hesitate to call or email should you have further questions....jg
  • jcrivella
    I just learned something recently regarding having more then one episode in order to meet the "criteria" of getting the diagnosis, well how many of us after diagnosis say "oh ya I had that happen to me but I just discounted it because it went away" well what I read about "documented" episodes is the insurance company put this criteria in place, which delays treatment for us. If you went to the hospital and had a heart attack, would they tell you to wait until the next heart attack before they diagnose you with a heart condition? or would they tell you until you have two organs effected by cancer we can't give you that diagnosis? No they don't that, but with MS they make you wait. Is it because we can live a long productive life with the proper meds that cost a fortune, well just a thought
  • capitolcarol

    Hi, I don't know whether you are still following the MS web pages.  Unfortunately, a lot of people, like myself, don't know that they had it in their family.  My mother took that secret to her grave.  It was only after a couple of years with the symptoms, firing one doctor and one neurologist, that I found out that I had MS.  I called my last remiaining relative, who confirmed it was in the family.  It is so unfortunate because I understand that there is great emphasis on earlly detection.  I don't really know when I was afflicted with MS and only recently was told that I had seconrdary progressive MS.  I am now 64 years old and what should have been "my golden years" is not going to be there.  I can't really walk even with a cane.  I have been on Tysbari monthly infusions for five months and just a couple of days ago started on Ampyra, the so-called "walking drug".  So far no change except I am doing stupid things and losing time.  I hope you are doing better.  Carol

  • kaoballard
    I was first diagnosed with MS when I was about 27, I think in the early 1980's. It started out with just blurred vision with migraines afterwards, dropping stuff constantly with numb hands and fatigue. More balance issues arrived with the diagnosis on RRMS in 2013. It was horrible to try to make it to work and do your work when you mind is so full of stuff. Congnitively I was shot and had to leave my job of 32 years because I was making too many errors and staff thought I was drinking with my "stumbling".
  • kaoballard
    It's was just recently that I discovered that a third cousin also has MS. I don't know if she is a "newbie" or has RRMS, but she is able to all the things she seems to what to do like ride and work.
  • evestarr1
    That's one advantage to using a device to aid balance! I'm hoping it takes the sting out of using a rolling walker in public, that the humiliation is a trade-off for a little respect lol! We have a joke in our house that I have a Minimum Daily Allowance on how many times I drop or spill something. Humor really helps, and I really don't want to fall in public.
  • marto4118

    No your not too young, I was 18 when diagnosed but showed symptoms at 15. Waited to diagnose me because of all the prexisting conditions of the time and I am now 36.  I sincerely wish u luck.

    Marty

  • chandrawilson34

    I know this  is a really late reply but i was reading everyone's response and I have just thought about how my mother was diagnosed at 35, I was diagnosed at 37, and now I worry about one of my three daughters, she is always tripping, getting dizzy, numbness in feet and sometimes hands, and has suffered from some depression.  My concern now is how soon should I worry about having my daughter tested?  Her symptoms never last for a long period of time but my neurologist says a relapse is when a symptom is on going for approximately 24 hours.  I am just concerned about her I wish I had went to a doctor when my symptoms starting occuring about 4 years earlier.

  • karana46
    Chandra, I know I might sound like an alarmist, but since I was DX at 15 and it saved me a lot of stress on one level, I would say get her in to neurologist. See if there is enough for an MRI, or just something her mind might be copying because mommy is going thru it. I honestly have no idea on the family connection since my mom when she started our our family genealogy a couples years after I was I DX never found another case as far back in our as could go on either side. My biological father was a closed adoption so we had no information on his family. Be safe and be strong.
  • ebeutell

    chandrawilson34,

    My dad has MS and when I started getting dizzy and went to my doctor (pediatrician at the time) and they couldn't come up with an answer, my mom took me to the neurologist to "rule out MS". When I was diagnosed, I was mad that she made me go, but if we had waited who knows what would have happened. I'm glad now (almost 7 years later) that she made me go so I could get on a DMT. In my humble opinion, you should get her checked out to "rule out MS".

    I pray that it's not MS and it just a pinched nerve or something.

    Best wishes,

    ebeutell

  • mlafontaine

    Thank you for sharing,

    That I know of to date I do not have any family members with MS, doesn/t mean that there aren't any,  I come from a very large family anything is possible. .

    I have met others most recently where MS is very prevalent in their families.

    Please know that as a member of the MS Community you are not alone ,we all understand your concerns and fears  and we truly care quite simply because we experience  MS...

     

     

  • Avatar
    I want to encourage you, no matter what you may find out in the future. First, our most recent information concerning MS having genetic ties are very low. New information is being discovered continually. When I was first diagnosed, my fear was tremendous. I had so little information that I thought MS was a death sentence. That was 15 years ago. I have great doctors that helped me focus on choosing a therapy and begin doing as many things possible to help myself. Always talk to someone to help you get through rough times. Know you are never alone.
  • capitolcarol

    Chatting online with others that have MS is very beneficial along with prayers too.  I have secondary progressive and used Tysabri for about 8 months, as well as Ampyra.  I developed PML so I have to stop Tysabri and also have stopped Ampyra because it didn't do anything for me.  I don't know what therapy program to go for now.  

    I always thought MS did run in the family.  Have they changed their minds on this?  Carol

     

  • susyqmt

    It obviously runs in my family... I have an older sister iwth it too....Guess that is why I was in denial for so many years, didn't really want to know I had it too!  

     

  • elipreis1

    Hi, I did not know for a long time that it runs in the family. I was diagnosed in April of 2013. I am the only person in my whole family from my mom side and my dad side that has MS. How and where..still puzzles me. My neurologist told me it's been there for sometime but he can't determine how long. I heard of it but did not know really what it was until I did some research to learn more about it.

  • Jeanie3
    I was diagnosed at 19 and kinda just made excuses for what deep down I knew was a symptom but if I don't say it out loud then I'm good. I can walk. I didn't get a flare up till I was 28 but when I did and couldn't walk I was so mad at myself for not recognizing it for what it really truly is. Now I'm 35 and feel like I'm just starting to live with all this crazy ***** I may have prevented or at least been prepared for what I one day was going to have to face and be..okay with it instead of WTF OMG I CAN'T FEEL MY WHOLE RIGHT SIDE lol Like I was shocked I couldn't but I think I lived my life always a lil scared and waiting for it to be real I didn't live at all
  • Jeanie3
    I was diagnosed at 19 and kinda just made excuses for what deep down I knew was a symptom but if I don't say it out loud then I'm good. I can walk. I didn't get a flare up till I was 28 but when I did and couldn't walk I was so mad at myself for not recognizing it for what it really truly is. Now I'm 35 and feel like I'm just starting to live with all this crazy ***** I may have prevented or at least been prepared for what I one day was going to have to face and be..okay with it instead of WTF OMG I CAN'T FEEL MY WHOLE RIGHT SIDE lol Like I was shocked I couldn't but I think I lived my life always a lil scared and waiting for it to be real I didn't live at all
  • mtonos

    I'm only 20 and I have been diagnosed.. It's good that we were lucky enough to catch it young before things got extremely bad. It's a blessing in disguise for me.. prayers for you! Hope all is well.. I was diagnosed this year.

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