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  • cstambaugh93
    hey guys im brand new, just got back my MRI results and have had MS on my list of suspected ailments for some time. about 4 months ago my left leg started going numb and now is almost completely numb most of the time. have also had swelling in the right side of my face that i thought was sinus related, but it has started making it hard for me to talk. have had on and off facial and arm numbness and extreme pain on my right side for a couple years that will get better sometimes.

    i guess my main question is they did find something on my MRI that is now leading them to the "small possibility" of MS (is what my dr said), and im wanting to know if she is just trying to make me not worry. my mri report had this on it.....

    There are very tiny small
    bilateral frontal periventricular and subcortical FLAIR hyperintense
    foci more marked on the right side.

    anyone recognize this lingo?

     
  • anywhereoutofthisworld
    I was diagnosed with Multiple sclerosis in late July of 2017 after a brain MRI came back showing lots of MS lesions and a spinal tap came back positive for high amounts of elevated protein 'o' bands. I am unsure of the lingo but I found a link online that should help you - Click Here Go to Link Here also is a link of criteria/ guidelines for MS diagnosis to review Click for criteria tipsheet.

    Now I am gonna list for you some common MS symptoms, shortly before I was diagnosed, this was the list of symptoms I reviewed that told me I was pretty sure I had MS.

    Speech and voice disorders
    ----------------------------------------
    Up to 40% of people with MS experience problems with their voice or speech.
    One possible problem is dysarthria, a motor speech problem that manifests as slurring, poor articulation of words, and speaking too loudly or too softly. Another possibility is dysphonia, a change in voice quality, such as sounding hoarse or nasal.

    Fatigue
    ----------------------------------------
    Some 80% of people with MS will experience fatigue at one point or another, but fatigue can have many causes. Some people experience “MS lassitude,” a very severe fatigue that occurs daily that tends to get worse as the day wears on.

    Numbness
    ---------------------------
    (or a lack of sensation in various parts of the body) is often one of the first symptoms to bring a person with MS to the doctor. Numbness can occur in the face, the body, or the arms and legs, and can interfere with walking, holding on to objects, and even chewing, if the numbness affects the face.
    Sometimes the feeling—or lack thereof—progresses over hours or days, but it usually subsides on its own.

    Vision problems
    ---------------------------------
    Like numbness, vision problems are one of the most common early symptoms prompting a person to visit the doctor. The problem can manifest as double vision, eye pain, blurred vision, or a scotoma (it looks like a hole in your vision).


    Bladder Dysfunction
    -------------------------------
    Bladder problems in people with MS can manifest in two, seemingly opposite ways. Some people have difficulty emptying their bladder. That means urine stays too long in the bladder, leading to infection, discomfort, and a distended bladder. Others can't keep the urine in, resulting in leakage and urgent frequent bathroom trips.

    Constipation/ IBS
    --------------------------------
    The most common bowel problem related to MS is constipation or also irritable bowel syndrome.

    Dizziness and Vertigo
    --------------------------
    The good news is that the symptoms of dizziness and vertigo often do go away and, for others, common drugs used to treat dizziness and vertigo in otherwise healthy people can be effective.

    Sexual Dysfunction
    ----------------------------
    There are three types of sexual problems related to MS, and the first is direct neurological damage to the nervous system. For women, that means loss of sensation, loss of vaginal lubrication, and an inability to achieve orgasm. For men, it can mean sensory changes as well as difficulty getting and maintaining an erection and difficulty reaching orgasm.
    In addition, people with MS might feel reticent about sex because they’re tired or are worried about bladder control. Some MS medications can also affect sexual function.

    Depression
    --------------------------
    Not surprisingly, depression is common among people with MS. Changes in the immune system can contribute to depression, as can biochemical changes in the brain.

    Cognitive Dysfunction
    --------------------------------------
    Cognitive dysfunction affects upwards of 60% of people with MS. The good news is that only specific areas are affected. This could be recent or “working” memory or the speed at which a person is able to process information. Or a person may have trouble focusing or multi-tasking. Once these problems start, they often don’t go away, but they do progress slowly.

    Anxiety
    --------------------------------
    This is the poor second cousin to depression. That’s because depression gets all the attention, though anxiety can be equally debilitating. Not only are there organic changes in the brain that result in anxiety, but the ongoing, uncertain nature of MS can be nerve-wracking.
    MS can also involve mood swings and irritability, although the irritability may be a consequence of depression.

    Emotional changes
    -------------------------------
    About 10% of people with MS may experience “pseudobulbar affect” (PBA), a neurologic change that usually occurs in tandem with cognitive changes. Here, the expression of a mood or feeling is disconnected from how a person’s actually feeling so a person may have uncontrolled bouts of crying when they’re not actually sad or they may laugh hysterically at inappropriate times.

    Pain
    ----------------------------------------
    The pain is often the direct result of nerves damaged by the disease. If this is the case, the person may feel severe burning sensations in their legs, feet or hands, or might imagine a knife is stabbing the side of his or her face because the nerves on that side are inflamed.

    Spasticity
    ---------------------
    Spasticity can involve both stiffness as well as involuntary muscle contractions. As a symptom of MS, it’s most common in the legs and may manifest as a mild feeling of tightness in the muscles or as more severe pain.

    Balance/ Coordination Problems
    --------------------------------
    People may report they feel suddenly weak in one limb or they may find objects slipping easily out of their hands. If there’s damage to the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls balance, people might also be unsteady on their feet and prone to falling.

    Tingling
    --------------------------
    Tingling is related to numbness and may feel like your arm, fingers, or toes are falling asleep, yet never quite waking up. Like other MS symptoms, this is a result of damaged nerves sending mixed signals to the different parts of the body. People may also experience something called the “MS hug.” It feels like somebody is grabbing them very tightly around the midsection, but it’s not muscular.

     
  • gabrielle519
    cstambaugh93,

    I understand your frustration. I will tell you that in order to make a diagnosis of MS they usually have to rule out everything else. There are many other things that could cause lesions on the  brain and some of the symptoms. I still think though that your doctor should be running more tests to find out what is causing the symptoms. Good luck.