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I Am a Runner

Blog Summary

Running is something I’ve always wanted to do. Growing up, I was chubby during my leanest years and obese the rest of the time. Running the mile in gym class was torture. I remember giving it my all and only making it about half way around the track before having to walk. I longed to know what that felt like–to run and not feel like I was going to vomit and pass out.

In September of 2015, I experienced some vertigo and vision issues that ultimately led to a diagnosis of MS. Along with establishing a treatment plan, I researched how the foods I was eating could reduce or increase chronic inflammation in my body and decided to give up grains, dairy and sugar. 180 pounds melted off my body in less than 18 months...

That Was Then, This is Now

Blog Summary

I first heard the words, “You have multiple sclerosis,” in 1986. I had no idea what that was or how I got it. How could this happen to me at the age of 28? I had my whole life in front of me. What would become of me? How will my life change? Will my boyfriend still love me? Will I die from it?   I had so many questions, and there were not many answers...

There are Two Sides to the Disabled Permit Coin

Blog Summary

Isn't it amazing how a piece of card with your picture on can be the biggest help, yet the biggest hindrance at the same time? From the perspective of a 20-something-year old who doesn't need a wheelchair, but still has a disabled permit, the following is what generally goes down...

Myths and Realities of the ADA

Blog Summary

The Internet is indeed a mixed blessing. The good news is that there’s an amazing amount of information out there. The bad news is that there’s an amazing amount of information out there. As an individual with multiple sclerosis, I have of course surfed the web, looking for answers. Once I learned how to separate the truthful and credible information from the wacky and even dangerous stuff, I learned a great deal...

Disabled to Enabled

Blog Summary

How does the term “disabled” make you feel?   For some people, it might be an easy transition. It might feel right for you, and if that is you, that’s okay...

Summer is Coming

Blog Summary

The sounds of birds singing, children playing and crickets chirping. The smell of barbeque, freshly cut grass or the beach. Sweaters have been replaced by t-shirts, pants with shorts, and shoes turn into flip-flops. It can only mean one thing...

Bachelorette Time!

Blog Summary

Weekends away with the girls is an experience like no other. Especially when one of your friends is getting married!   The girls are invited, everything has been planned you've FINALLY got everything sorted and paid up—it's time to start counting down the days to the bachelorette party!...  

Aging With Grace

Blog Summary

There’s a certain freedom to turning 40 and realizing that, even now, I am a work in progress.   Sure, I wanted to be able to write one of those inspiring posts—you know, the ones that say look at me, I just turned 40 and I ran a marathon, or climbed a mountain, or bungee jumped off a cliff...

The Zen of MS

Blog Summary

That’s what we’re all looking for, isn’t it? The truth is, when you find your zen, it is much easier to heal. I don’t mean heal in the sense of “find a cure,” but rather in the sense of “I am happy with my life and feel like I am the best person that I can be, disease or not.” I’m confessing to you that I’m the latter...

When MS Changes the Marital Equation

Blog Summary

For decades, we have considered ourselves partners.   We divvied up decision making and household chores the best we could. After our three children were born—including a set of twins—we took pride in our co-parenting efforts. Although the 50-50 quality of our 26-year-old marriage was tested when the kids were young and I opted to teach college part-time and work as a writer from a home office, we continued to earnestly pursue the goal of domestic equity...

Mood and MS

Blog Summary

Those of us who have been involved in both the research and care of people with MS walk a tightrope sometimes between pointing out the severity of a problem and solving it. We want to alert our patients without overwhelming them. On Thursday, I attended a session on depression and other mood disorders at the Consortium of MS Centers meeting in Seattle that really brought home how prevalent these symptoms are in people with MS. While the numbers are sobering, the message is clear: bringing this information to light can only bring us closer to finding solutions. Depression is two or more times more prevalent in people with MS than in the general population, says Dr. Scott Patten (from the University of Calgary) in his review of the studies (find his presentation here). When researchers try to find out what factors predict lower quality of life, depression gets high marks. Not surprising, since depression affects how you function at work, in school, in your social life and during recreational activities...