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The Adequation Complex

Blog Summary

“One of the most important things to someone with a chronic illness is to be treated as an equal. Having MS does not make me any different than someone who does not.”

This was something I used to tell myself every single day since my diagnosis—it got me through the hard times and inspired me to live my highest quality of life. But as I get older and the 4 year anniversary of my diagnosis approaches, I find myself questioning if this is really the case...
 

Rise Up

Blog Summary

Resilience is the capacity to recover from difficulties and finding your strength within. Where do I begin? I’m 39 years old and have been through my share of difficulties. If I’ve learned anything, it’s that no matter what happens, you have to get back up and fight all the curve balls that this life throws you...

How a Shirt Can Make All the Difference

Blog Summary

So, this is one of those blogs you may or may not completely agree with.   Now, don’t get me wrong—I know a shirt or pair of sneakers won’t exactly cure your MS, but it can certainly make a difference...

When Fatherhood Meets MS

Blog Summary

It bothers me. I want to do more. Be part of more. See more. And I think, for any father, the “more” is what truly matters. It’s being there for them and, as a result, your children knowing that you are there for them… always...

“Because She’s Sick”

Blog Summary

Have you ever experienced someone else’s ignorance or intolerance about your MS? Have you ever had someone make you feel different or isolated from the rest of the world? Well you are not! You have MS but MS does not have you; never let someone feel like less than you are. This is my wake-up call and message to those who feel this disease defines who we are:...

MS & Movement

Blog Summary

One of the things I love about attending the Annual Meeting of the Consortium of MS Centers is how many studies focus on pinpointing problems in the daily lives of people with MS and how to find solutions. This is the point of rehabilitation–to restore or maintain function as much as possible. One problem that is being investigated is sedentary behavior, also called “sitting time.” Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and colleagues around the country administered a physical activity questionnaire to more than 6,000 people with MS...

Thinking About Emotional Wellness

Blog Summary

Last week, I attended the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Los Angeles. There were several studies presented on aspects of emotional health, and it got me thinking about how important it is to remember that our emotional health can affect many aspects of living with MS. Research has shown that anxiety and depression can occur as MS symptoms, not just as reactions to having the disease. One poster presentation I saw was by Canadian researchers, who generally do a pretty good job tracking people with MS because of their unified health systems and electronic records. They reported that anxiety (and diabetes) could have a negative impact on a person’s cognition. The researchers commented that it’s possible that treating diabetes or anxiety could improve cognitive problems for people with MS.

Dealing with Literal Loneliness

Blog Summary

Being diagnosed with MS at any age is never fun, but when you’re a young person diagnosed with MS, it seems to change more in your mind than just myelin!   I was diagnosed at just 22 years old. When I came out of the hospital after my diagnosis, I had to confront what seemed like a new life...

It's Time

Blog Summary

Have you ever had a moment where you realize, “it’s time?” Time to make a change and let go of the past? When I was 10 years old, I had my first job delivering newspapers...

What I Wish...

Blog Summary

MS symptoms vary from person to person. Even more, symptoms are often invisible. Because of this, it can be difficult to describe your symptoms or get someone to relate to your experience. For MS Awareness Week (March 11-17), we asked you, “what do you wish people knew about MS?" Here’s what you said...

My Story Goes on

Blog Summary

Stunned is hardly the word for how I felt … Shocked, devastated … those are the feelings I remember. At age 45, I had finally achieved some professional success, having just been named partner in a large law firm. It had been a struggle because for 20 years I had been experiencing odd physical sensations, fatigue and inability to concentrate.   In my personal life, I had two young children, had recently remarried, and had welcomed two stepchildren. What had been a happy new life for all of us suddenly became a very confusing, painful time. Full of many questions and concerns, and none of us had any answers...