Surrendering my driver's license

Looking in my rearview mirror all I could see was a profusion of pink. Leotards, tights, tulle skirts, slippers and dance bags belonging to the three giggling girls in my back seat. It was my turn to pick up the ladies from ballet that very warm fall afternoon. I got caught in heavy stop-and-go traffic. Suddenly, my right leg would not move anymore between the gas and brake, and when I did step on the brake my leg bounced wildly up and down.

Panic was not an option. My daughter was sitting in the front next to me and inquired as to why my leg was acting so funny. I reassured her it was just my bad leg acting up, which immediately was relayed to the back seat, “Mom’s bad leg is acting up. We are pulling over for popsicles and treats.” Fortunately there was a convenience store up-ahead and with the help of my left foot we made it safely into the parking lot. The corps du ballet jumped out, thankfully oblivious of what could have become a bad situation.
 
This incident happened many years ago, but it came to mind as my daughter was recently getting her learner’s permit. Hannah was taking the written test to obtain her driver’s license and I was in line, sitting in my wheelchair, waiting to surrender mine. I had stopped driving many years before, but the act of surrendering my license made me feel diminished, as both a mom and an adult. I could have driven longer had we adapted my car with hand controls, but it would have meant selling my SUV, buying a new car and making the changes, that at the time were cost prohibitive. I wasn’t ready for that day and I wasn’t ready to feel yet another loss that MS brings.

Having a driver’s license gives credibility, an identity, and proof of existence, not to mention the freedom to come and go, for good reasons, bad reasons, or no reason at all. The plus side to all of this is that Hannah has passed her road test and she can now take herself to softball practice, music lessons, and school functions too numerous to recount, greatly relieving the stress of having only one driver in the family.
 
As for that warm autumn afternoon, my husband was on his way home from work, and when I called him he was able to quickly swing by and pick us all up. I continued to drive for quite a while after that incident, probably too long, but it was so hard to stop. 
13 Appreciate this
| Reply
Susan

Susan Skoney, Blogger

Susan Skoney was diagnosed in 1999. She lives in western New York with her husband Michael and daughter Hannah. She worked many years in public relations and advertising, and has just started writing about her MS in the last few years.

Leave a Comment

Thanks for sharing your thoughts with the MSconnection.org community. Please note comments are moderated.

    57 Comments

  • Kate   Dec 10, 2015 3:59 PM
    Thank you for sharing this. This is my biggest fear. On my bad days, I choose not to drive but the good days are becoming less and less. I hope when that day comes for me, I'll be ok.
  • Jeff   Dec 10, 2015 4:14 PM
    Your story brought tears to my eyes. Don't let the MS take anything else from you. My son is 23 and was diagnosed last year. My God bless you and your family. Almighty God grant your extordinary favor for all suffering MS. Cure this disease through your Devine love and mercy.
  • Jane   Dec 10, 2015 4:21 PM
    I stopped driving about 2 years ago. I was scaring myself (right leg is my "Bad" leg thanks to MS. Do you have to turn in (surrender) your DL? I was going to keep and even renew it for identification reasons
  • Shelley   Dec 10, 2015 4:31 PM
    I was diagnosed in 1994 after I lost my vision in my right eye and had tingling and numbness all over my body . My vision returned and I continued working as a speech and language therapist. Fast forward to 2008. I was sitting on the couch watching TV when I realized I could not see out of my left eye. I was hospitalized and put on steroids. My vision never never returned . I can no longer drive and rely on people to drive me all over. It's a horrible feeling to loose your independence.
  • Terrance Galloway   Dec 10, 2015 4:44 PM
    I surrendered my CDL (license) five years ago even though they said I could continual to drive but I just didn't feel safe behind the wheel of a big truck. I seem to be getting to that point with my personal truck. I'm not sure but I find myself doing items that would not be considered safe. I thing I know how she must feel, M.S has taken a lot from and this will be the next. I don't drive as much as I use to, on good days I drive and have no problems but on bad days I will not drive knowing that I'm not all there. I miss running the roadways but I have to tell myself if your not all there it might be time to leave the road.

    Terry
  • Angela   Dec 10, 2015 4:52 PM
    I dread this day. I can still walk, but I'm not the woman I was just a few years ago. I fear what I'll be in the future. I already can't work (the MS affects me cognitively worse than physically so far) and I have days when I don't even know what day it is, and other days when I'm almost myself. Of course I can't plan on when I'll be one or the other - it just happens. Bad days I just don't leave the house.
  • Carla   Dec 10, 2015 4:57 PM
    I to know about the inconveniences of no driver's license. Mine due to seizures brought on by multiple sclerosis. It's been 15 years and I'm 47. I hate the fact I can't come and go and more so than anything I can't have the freedom of working. Yes there is worse things in life than not having a driver's license but knowing that the chances of you ever getting them back is very very slim is just a shame. I just thank God I have people in my life that are willing to take me here and there. So Susan I feel your pain but rest assured it gets better because it just becomes a part of life just like multiple sclerosis.
  • Deb Eveland   Dec 10, 2015 5:11 PM
    Thank you for sharing your story. It hits close to home. I was diagnosed in 1995. I recently went to renew my license, but they would only let me do so with a Dr.'s release. I felt like I'd been punched! Well I got the Dr's release(good for 2 years). I am resolved to the reality the day will come that I am not able to use my legs. I pray I'll have your courage. Does anyone know if hand controlled adaptions would be an option?
  • Chasy   Dec 10, 2015 5:56 PM
    I'm 33 in just got diagnosed about 3 week ago and I'm terrified. I have a six years old son I want to make it to all his sport and school activities. I'm crying right now as I right How does everyone do this???
  • Angela   Dec 10, 2015 6:01 PM
    I completely understand. I had nearly the exact same incident driving home with my then 10 year old daughter. I was only a mile from home and thankfully I was driving an automatic, so although uncomfortable I was able to get us home safely using my left leg. I handed my husband the keys to my car and have not driven since. That day I realized that I was putting my fear of losing my independence, and my denial about having MS ahead of my child's safety, and that was absolutely unacceptable. The thing that made it really it home was the fact that until that moment I had been having a good day health wise, so I forced to confront the fact that shear willpower does not stop MS.
  • Deborah   Dec 10, 2015 6:44 PM
    Thanks for sharing! There is strength in knowing the ms issues others deal with.
  • Fabienne   Dec 10, 2015 8:20 PM
    I drive my daughter to soccer all the time and I now drive myself to work everyday with a handicap pass in order to park right next to school everyday. Thank you for sharing, I often wonder what I would do if I could not drive especially being the only driver in the family. My boys have not gotten their license yet and my daughter is 17, so will be driving very soon. Thank you for making me realize there's nothing wrong with it
  • Nicole   Dec 10, 2015 10:09 PM
    Thank you for sharing
  • Noreen   Dec 11, 2015 12:48 AM
    My husband's driving is getting scary. What's even more scary is he doesn't even acknowledge it. This week he pulled out in front of a motorcycle. He could of killed that person, but he was more concerned with yelling at me for telling him not to pull into that lane. He yelled at me for gasping and putting my hands over my mouth. He yelled at me like I was the one who did it while at the same time refused to acknowledge there was even a problem. He said he didn't care and just wanted me to shut up. Unfortunately the only thing I think will stop this is if he has an accident.
  • Mike Spencer   Dec 11, 2015 3:21 AM
    You are absolutely right and you have put the feeling of hopelessness and fear so well. Actually having been able to drive all my working life and having now to be a passenger with many other things to think about apart from the symptoms of MS is the worst thing I have had to put up with. Just looking at our car and its ability to get me to where I want to go and realising I have to rely on other people is bad enough, and that has been going on for some 23 years. The only thing that can save me is my humour and the amazing thing is that it has expanded beyond all belief. I can be stupid and chuckle whenever I want to but I still look as a happily married man with 4 offspring at that wonderful creation the car as a thing which puts me in the hands of others. Ah well, life goes on.
  • Janet Morrison   Dec 11, 2015 3:51 AM
    I was diagnosed with MS in Sept 2012, I had the loss of vision firstly and couldn't see the road signs and thought all the cars were driving on the footpath, thankfully my partner was driving the car! I didn't drive for 2 years then ended up getting hand controls in my car and haven't looked back since. It was pure hell not being able to drive, not to mention not having the identification on me. In those 2 years my licence had run out. After seeing the Drs and having my eyes tested I was given the ok to drive again. I have to have them tested once a year, to make sure I am ok to drive. My right leg is the one that I have trouble with as I have dropped foot and tend to trip up a lot. I too have a handicapped parking sticker which is a blessing when you don't have as far to walk to the shops or medical centre. Life can test you but there are ways to beat almost everything tossed in your way!
  • sarah   Dec 11, 2015 5:09 AM
    I was dignoised with ms in 2011, I suffered from headaches on one side of my head but know I get pains in my arms and legs which affects me from different everyday activities.
  • Sally martin   Dec 11, 2015 7:33 AM
    Hello,

    I sent my driving licence to the dvla as requested post diagnosis (may 2013), but they won't send it back! My professor has to contact them but he won't! I have never crashed a car! Aaarrrgghhhh! X X X
  • Lillian Dec.11, 2015 12:55 PM   Dec 11, 2015 12:23 PM
    Thank you os much for all of your sharing,and I was diagnosed with M.S. March 2008,after I lost my vision in my (right eye,)-then the tingiling and numbness in both hands , with the left leg kept locking up on me while trying to drive along with low back pains. Yes I to had to give up my (license)as well. but I still will Thank God for another Year, of- allowing me to Keep Keeping on, with M.S. and always Keeping these four( H's) in mine, while trusting God through it all-[Life' is- {Hard},and Life can {Hurt},-but God {Heals},and {Church} {Helps} we are Blessed to able to Keep Keeping On!" alright :)"[Psalm 71-19-:..Your righteousness,O God, is very high,(21):- -You shall increase my greatness, And comfort me on every side'. To;- God Be the Glory in us All !"
  • georgeatek  Dec 11, 2015 1:17 PM
    I had to quit driving because I got to where I couldn't get in or out of the car without assistance and my family was worried about my driving abilities. I miss my independence but it is better than being responsible for a serious accident where some people got injured.
  • DeaAnn Fisk   Dec 11, 2015 1:52 PM
    I have progressive M.S. In order to get a Washington Driver's License I have to take a road test so I am practicing. I am wearing a leg bag for my bladder, and having tibia stimulation at the urologist in hopes that my bladder will start functioning normally again.
  • Pam   Dec 11, 2015 4:30 PM
    I felt the same way when I surrendered my license. I have since bought a mobility scooter that I use to go places locally. It helped just knowing I can go out when I want.
  • Anonymous   Dec 11, 2015 4:38 PM
    MS disease is too serious and unpredictable to rely on false notions of feeling "in control" on a "good" day while driving.
  • Adrienne   Dec 11, 2015 4:38 PM
    I had a very similar situation and had hand controls installed. Eventually, going out to the garage was too much, I also am now in a wheelchair and still miss the independence of driving.
  • Helen Mudry   Dec 11, 2015 5:04 PM
    You're right, a driver's license is a proof of identity. When I stopped driving, at first it was difficult for me to ask others for rides but, most friends were very glad to help. Cancelling car insurance has beenan economic pluus
  • Linda   Dec 11, 2015 5:14 PM
    I was diagnosed with MS in "12 a month after my husband was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia. He can no longer drive. My right leg is my problem and I know that eventually I will go to hand controls. The expense of that bothers me. Until then, I am grateful that I can still drive. I know your angst.
  • Avatar
    Marcus  Dec 11, 2015 8:39 PM
    My greatest fear is having to surrender my driver's license before my car is paid off...Silly right?
  • Kimberly   Dec 11, 2015 10:03 PM
    I have often wondered what I would do driving my three kiddos and something like that happened to me. I keep my muscle relaxers on the glove box. Thanks for sharing your experience, and not driving may be really good there are some crazy people out there.
  • Avatar
    sue-peer  Dec 17, 2015 12:59 AM
    Thanks for sharing your story about MS and driving. I think this a very important topic. I have lived with ms for over forty years. I chose to stop driving about 10 years ago when I returned home from participating in one of my volunteer activities. I pulled my car into the garage and all of a sudden I was unable to move my foot from the gas pedal to the brake. I stopped the car by pushing the brake with my hand.
    I decided to stop driving on that day I did not want to injure or kill another person due to my inability to accept my coordination difficulty.
    I went through periods of hiring cabs and taking buses. I now hire a private driver to take me to my activities... I keep my driver's
    license renewed l for id purposes. I
    I am interested in studying my options to use a driverless vehicle for transpirtation
    It was difficult to stop driving but U believe it was an ethical decision I had to make.
  • Gwynnica  Dec 22, 2015 8:23 AM
    Hello,

    I was diagnosed with MS back on December 5, 2011. I was the first and only diagnosed in my family. I've had about 3 exacerbations in the last 6 months ranging from numbness in my legs, arms, to numbness below the said; no control over anything below the waist, to an immediate exacerbation a few weeks later of balance being off, head very cloudy, not being able to drive in which in need to for work. I turned 32 in July so I'm kind of young. I have no children. I chose to have a partial hysterectomy because I wasn't too sure about MS and I didn't want to pass anything on to a child that I gave birth to. I can understand about not wanting MS to have the upper hand and controlling your life but the unfortunate thing is that, we have no control over anything with it. The only thing I do is let go and let God.
  • Nichole   Dec 22, 2015 9:53 AM
    Sending love and blessings! I identify a little with your post. My license has just been revoked due to seizures. I have just been diagnosed with MS and Epilepsy. I love the way you told your story! Your life is a gift <3
    -Nichole
  • William Clapie   Dec 22, 2015 10:41 AM
    On September second this year I wrecked a motorized bicycle. Yeah, kinda funny maybe but the witness at first said I was "tagged" by a car then said I lost control. I have no memory of either, The accident was hard and fast enough to put a sizable gash in my scalp that later required surgery to repair. Now. I have MS or I would not be commenting. suffered for a couple of decades with various signs and symptoms, fully diagnosed about six years ago. That being said, do I quit riding,driving, walking? I already fell trapped dammit.

    Bill
  • Debbie   Dec 22, 2015 11:23 AM
    I totally understand. 2012 I totaled my car because I could not get my foot off the gas and onto the brake fast enough. Luckily, no one was hurt, just the car!. 2 months of Driver's Rehab learning how to drive with hand controls, and thousands of dollars later, my car now has hand controls and I drive again. Was it worth it? Yes. I don't drive as much as I used to, but at least I can take myself to Dr. appts. and run errands. I suggest to others that you don't wait until you wreck your car to take action about your driving. I was having "problems" before I had the accident but I kept ignoring them and then it was too late.
  • ohr4recovery  Dec 22, 2015 8:00 PM
    Thank you for sharing
  • tnigro70  Dec 30, 2015 9:44 PM
    That will happen to my leg from time to time when I drive. My leg bounces.it has not happened for some time, but when it does I don't drive.
  • Cliff Meyer   Jan 5, 2016 2:18 PM
    Wow, Susan reading your blog and all that follow, now I have a tears in my eyes. We feel your pain, but I just want to instill a little positive into this sad circumstance. I was diagnosed 43 years when I was 30. My wife was pregnant with twins unbeknownst to us, already having 3 kids, we thought life was over for us when the Doctor asked me what I did for a living. I told him I worked with my hands, He said I better find another job because I would loose the use of my hands in 6 months and latter I would go blind. I had no Collage and my wife did not work.
    Well the twins came and they were the joy of out life, I started getting better, my hands are numb but fine, My eyes are normal and I continue to work. I still work today at 73 in my own business. I have secondary progression. Try to be happy not depressed, stay active, join a Gym and keep your body at the proper weight.
    I know I have been lucky, Keep your chin up and smile, a cure will be in you life time
  • Tracey   Jan 9, 2016 9:18 AM
    Been there, I know some of how you felt, although I haven't had to give up driving (just a lot of other things). But, I understand the feeling of 'diminishment' all too well. There are so many 'normal' things that I, you, and many others have had to give up and accept as the 'new normal' , it's sometimes a bit overwhelming. Knowing and sharing with others like this seems to help somewhat though, thank you.
  • Avatar
    traceyfm  Jan 9, 2016 10:21 AM
    To Deb, yes hand controls are Definately an option for the car! I don't know what I would have done if they were not. I got to the point ( unfortunately) that I was tugging on my pant leg to get my right leg/foot to move to the gas pedal and brake...definitely not safe! That was when I finally had to accept that this was not a 'passing' issue and big changes had to be made! The hand controls and learning to use them though was very empowering! Good luck to you!
  • Avatar
    traceyfm  Jan 9, 2016 10:35 AM
    For Jane...I (fortunately) did not have to surrender my drivers license when my 'driving' leg/foot quit working. I took some classes (thru the state) and got hand controls installed in my car. They are wonderful and quite empowering!
  • Midge Ruffner Kogler   Jan 11, 2016 8:47 PM
    It was my job to evaluate people for their safety for driving. I taught people how to use hand controls. That was 10 years after I was diagnosed. I could recognize when I needed hand controls (I hated long red lights). For the last year I haven't been able to drive independently, but only because I can't get my scooter in and out of my car by myself anymore. I have a power wheelchair now, and I'm waiting for my lowered floor van so I can be independent again. I have been one of the lucky ones.
  • Jen   Jan 14, 2016 8:18 AM
    Susan thank you so much for sharing. I surrendered my license for several months last year due to MS. That was such a difficult time. I have my license back now, but no longer take driving for granted. Blessings to you!
  • Jenneve   Jan 17, 2016 7:15 PM
    Driving I have decided to give up in 2015 following an RTA which occurred after my right foot refused to lift onto the brake pedal, ( problems to my right leg started to occur following an abdominal hysterectomy 2010 ) usually my left leg is the weaker leg. On the day of the RTA, I was
    driving back from a pilates class. I drove an automatic car as my initial symptoms affected my left leg. My first ever symptoms where of numbness and tingling to my fingers in 1995, which I chose to ignore. These were one of many symptoms I would ignore, deeming them as minor problems. It was not until the MS started to affect my recreational activities exercise and running 2001, (I used to do fun runs and marathons running), that I went to my gp. My left leg started to go numb and dead after 6 miles running, (Prior to this I would trip and fall over on my runs blaming it on poor running style or my running shoes being too big) I eventually went to my gp, she referred me to a neurologist in 2003 and in 2005 I was diagnosed with MS. Since then I have had to retire from work the MS affected my vision, ( I was a midwife ) and since stopping driving I have also stopped going to the gym. I now exercise at home and go out on my mobility scooter, which helps to get me out to meet others. At first I found not driving a hassle and a massive loss. But being able to go out on my scooter in most weather conditions, allows me get out to meet members of my community and I don't feel so isolated.
  • Jenneve   Jan 17, 2016 7:15 PM
    Driving I have decided to give up in 2015 following an RTA which occurred after my right foot refused to lift onto the brake pedal, ( problems to my right leg started to occur following an abdominal hysterectomy 2010 ) usually my left leg is the weaker leg. On the day of the RTA, I was
    driving back from a pilates class. I drove an automatic car as my initial symptoms affected my left leg. My first ever symptoms where of numbness and tingling to my fingers in 1995, which I chose to ignore. These were one of many symptoms I would ignore, deeming them as minor problems. It was not until the MS started to affect my recreational activities exercise and running 2001, (I used to do fun runs and marathons running), that I went to my gp. My left leg started to go numb and dead after 6 miles running, (Prior to this I would trip and fall over on my runs blaming it on poor running style or my running shoes being too big) I eventually went to my gp, she referred me to a neurologist in 2003 and in 2005 I was diagnosed with MS. Since then I have had to retire from work the MS affected my vision, ( I was a midwife ) and since stopping driving I have also stopped going to the gym. I now exercise at home and go out on my mobility scooter, which helps to get me out to meet others. At first I found not driving a hassle and a massive loss. But being able to go out on my scooter in most weather conditions, allows me get out to meet members of my community and I don't feel so isolated.
  • Melinda Maze   Jan 27, 2016 8:07 PM
    I would be the same way, I wish there was a way to educate law enforcement as to the problems. I heard on the news that autistic people can get an ID card to show should they be pulled over. I do not usually drive very far alone anymore, I live where all the places I need to go and do business is less than 3 miles. I can handle these trips If I were to be pulled over I would probably FREAK. Does anyone know of such a card or something to identify yourself as having MS to show law enforcement?
  • juliey26  Feb 5, 2016 7:47 PM
    I would wait for people to leave from work so I would not hold up the line to leave.
    My right foot does not cooperate when putting it on the gas pedal.
    It almost feels like a relief that my husband takes me to work.
    I knew my driving was getting worse and thankful to get a ride to appointments.
  • Leida Lopez   Feb 21, 2016 4:17 PM
    I have someone close at heart and I would like to learn all about ms I appreciate your story May God bless you and your family. Thank you
  • Kathy   Feb 22, 2016 6:08 PM
    I understand what you are going through. I lost total vision of my right eye from a virus when I was a child. I progressed to tunnel vision in my left eye about a year ago and had 2 car accidents. I had to stop driving for mine and others safety. My son lives with me, is disabled and doesn't drive. It is really difficult without a driver in the house. Its given me humility about riding the bus and friends. Thank God for them
  • Sally   Feb 25, 2016 10:43 AM
    I was diagnosed deter all years ago. That same day the neurologist told me she would have to send a report to the Dmv that I should no longer drive. I have always love driving and was good at it as well but before my diagnosis I noticed not feeling comfortable driving and not really knowing why. I felt relieved that that burden was removed. Fortunately In live in San Francisco which has a great transportation system and I use Lyft for the times when I am just too tired to move any more. But I have to say I spent many hours taking children to and from lessons and games, so I can understand how difficult that can be. But I also know that there are great communities who can support you, reach out, encourage compassion for yourself, and look for the hidden blessings that can come from this challenge.💕
  • Cathy Best   Feb 25, 2016 2:13 PM
    I was diagnosed in 2005, have had symptoms since the 90's. I am in the process of getting hand controls. I mostly have balance issues but my right leg spasms when sitting a long time and I don't have a lot of feeling in my feet and so have had several scary situations were my foot has slipped off the brake and I was wildly trying to get my foot back on. It absolutely terrifies you! I don't feel safe anymore. I use the cruise control all the time when driving distances so that my foot and leg aren't being held in a position to bring on the spasms. I have been doing 15 minutes per night on a stationary bike to help keep my strength up.
  • Cathy Best   Feb 25, 2016 2:13 PM
    I was diagnosed in 2005, have had symptoms since the 90's. I am in the process of getting hand controls. I mostly have balance issues but my right leg spasms when sitting a long time and I don't have a lot of feeling in my feet and so have had several scary situations were my foot has slipped off the brake and I was wildly trying to get my foot back on. It absolutely terrifies you! I don't feel safe anymore. I use the cruise control all the time when driving distances so that my foot and leg aren't being held in a position to bring on the spasms. I have been doing 15 minutes per night on a stationary bike to help keep my strength up.
  • Pengobatan Alternatif Semua Penyakit   Mar 3, 2016 7:08 PM
    Thanks for the info you provide , may be useful to us as visitors . Do not forget to visit also the health website here http://goo.gl/YnKkIl http://goo.gl/r1YHxY https://goo.gl/0W6q87
  • Pengobatan Alternatif Semua Penyakit   Mar 3, 2016 7:09 PM
    Thanks for the info you provide , may be useful to us as visitors . Do not forget to visit also the health website here http://goo.gl/YnKkIl http://goo.gl/r1YHxY https://goo.gl/0W6q87
  • Chundun Takher   Mar 18, 2016 12:05 AM
    Hi everyone, my fiancé was diagnosed in September 2015 at the age of 26. She is the most wonderful person anyone can meet. She is warm spirited and just all around the sweetest person anyone could ever be. We are planning on getting married next month in April. Being her support, the person she relies on to tell her everything will be ok....in reality, I don't know what I can do but to just listen and assure her that science is finding a way everyday in creating a potential cure, vaccine, new treatments. I read most of these stories and it scares me to think what could happen to her. She reads and learns all the daunting things that could happen, not to mention how scared she is all the time, everyday about how her body is doing. Is there any advice from anyone that I could give her to reassure her and to help her feel safe?? I just don't know what to say to her sometimes, it breaks my heart that I'm going to take the vows to protect her and be there for her through the toughest of times, yet in reality, I simply cant protect her from this.
  • Lisa Jensen-Farmer   Mar 20, 2016 8:09 PM
    I was diagnosed in early 2015 and it seems to have hit hard. I had a similar driving incident in early December 2015. My old bldg. manager and family friend had a massive stroke and I needed to bring my oldest to the hospital to let him know how loved he is with us. I had flare ups and could barely use my right side, needless to say it has a very hard 27 min. drive. My oldest daughter was very scared and I was too. I worked very hard to watch the road and watch my left foot trying to drive. We made it there and back but it was not the most fabulous drive I ever had. Reading the above tale of what you went through hit me hard.
  • liam   Mar 22, 2016 11:59 PM
    I to can relate. I been rr for years but still walking and driving. Then about 5 years ago istart having gait issues starte with a cane then walker then scooter. But still driving. Then in 2013 had a bad relapse and lost the ability to drive. Now Im spms in a power chaironly have use of right hand but a fortunate to have the oppoutunity to start learning to drive an alternative vehicle with ajoy stick system. Im first just workng on being able to test and qualify for having the license endoursemet for altenatve vehicle on the driver license the work on getting a vehicle. Just being able to drivers traing on thecalternatve vehicle has helped with my emotional health and self esteem. It has brighten up my life. At least i feel like i am atleast winnng one battle in this war with ms.
  • Carolyn Hodges   Apr 15, 2016 3:21 PM
    I do not have MS but a high school friend did. At 15 she was often tripping or missing the ball in gym. She made a joke of how clumsy she was. She was diagnosed 4 years later and gone at age 25. I thought, at that time, that it took long years to decline that much. Couse, this was 1958 to 1968 . I ignored the disease until recently. Ms Funicello got me interested.
  • raymond   Aug 12, 2016 10:17 AM
    why do you need a reason to surrender your drivers license you do not need a reason if u want to surrender your drivers license