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Questions to Ask Your Neurologist About Your MS

Blog Summary

You’ve just been diagnosed with MS. You’ve heard about the disease (“OMG, I’m going to be in a wheelchair”). You’ve heard something about the medications that are now available for MS, but know little about them. You’ve seen other people with MS, but how does their course relate to yours? What can you do to prevent disability? These and many other questions crowd in on you, and it all seems overwhelming. You need to spend more time with your neurologist or nurse specialist, but don’t know where to start. Hopefully the following questions to ask will be a guide for you...

What We Know: Answering Your COVID-19 Questions

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People with multiple sclerosis are the reason the National MS Society is here, and we know this time of uncertainty can be unsettling. We are working closely with our partners around the globe to bring you the latest, most accurate information possible to keep you and your families safe as we move through the COVID-19 pandemic together.   Here are some of the recent questions asked on our Ask an Expert call...

Finally Diagnosed

Blog Summary

I had the first MS symptom in 2007 while I was in college and just finished my last class. Suddenly, there was severe tingling and numbness in my whole left upper limb. I thought it could be a result of strenuous day. Everyone left the classroom, and I was trying to release my hand. But it was not releasing. Two of my friends came back after noticing me not coming. We went to the hospital.  In the emergency ward, basic tests were done. I could sense that my heart was beating very fast. It was about 6 p.m.. The senior doctor arrived and checked me. He suggested an immediate X-ray and the results came back normal. So, he referred me to orthopaedic doctor. The next day, the orthopaedic doctor suggested I get an MRI of my cervical spine. He suspected I had thoracic outlet syndrome. But when my reports came normal, I went on to hear more suspected illnesses that could be causing my odd symptoms: nerve impingement, peroneal nerve injury or palsy. My tingling and numbness subsided before any nerve conduction tests were done, and my other symptoms like blurred vision, just went away.

Everyone Else’s

Blog Summary

Sometimes it can be difficult to live with those pesky MS symptoms that get in the way of the things you actually want to do. It makes it harder that no one else can see or understand the illness too, right?   The thing that makes symptoms even harder to deal with is when a loved one or a friend starts to put their ailments onto you. You know what I’m talking about. When someone tells you they are also exhausted, they also “didn’t sleep well” and they also “have terrible back pain.” Am I right in saying your first thought is, “well it’s not as bad as mine?”...

Check List: Managing MS Through the COVID-19 Crisis

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Managing MS is challenging, given its unpredictable nature. Managing MS in times of stress – such as we are all experiencing now with the COVID-19 pandemic – can make it even more challenging. Here are a few tips and resources that may help you and your family manage through this very difficult time...

Coping with COVID-19 and MS

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Because of COVID-19, many of us who take disease-modifying therapies for MS are stuck in a tricky situation. How cautious do we need to be? How high IS the risk? If we are due for another infusion or dose of medication, should we take it or wait a few weeks? How isolated do we need to be? I just had my infusion (with ocrelizumab) two weeks ago, which suppressed my immune system in order to control my MS. These questions of risk are personal and real...

3 Mindset Hacks to Reduce Your Anxiety

Blog Summary

Invisible illness comes with many ups and downs along the journey. When you’re first diagnosed and suddenly find yourself living in a hospital, it can come as a bit of a shock. You may have to have tests you’ve only ever seen on Grey’s Anatomy, or even start on a medication that involves something you’re not used to. For me it was my first injectable treatment—I just couldn’t get on with it. I remember having panic attack after panic attack.   When I was first diagnosed 6 years ago, I was petrified of needles. Blood tests, I found, were always really difficult for me. I’d be sitting in the waiting room, palms sweating, heart beating like crazy, I couldn't breathe. Constantly thinking to myself, “I can’t do this...”

How My Superpower Fights Multiple Sclerosis

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From the moment of my diagnosis, I was determined not to let MS defeat me. Although I was terrified of what MS would mean for my future, I slowly gathered my armor; (information), made my battle plan (improved diet, exercise, sleep and stress management strategies) and planted my feet for a fight. Lines were drawn between me and my immune system, both sides gaining and losing ground. While I hoped for a truce, I diligently worked on fortifying myself from the inside out, but MS was persistent. Through the years, I learned to acknowledge and trust in attributes that I never knew I had. I came to understand that these qualities were secret weapons to help me in my fight toward wellness.

Ready, Set, MS: My Sudden and Not-So-Surprising Diagnosis

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I specifically remember driving away from work on a Friday afternoon feeling like I had somehow hit my elbow and it was tingling. "Weird," I thought, as I shrugged it off. I was headed to one of the last Anaheim Ducks games of the season, and I was so excited. It was late March and a group of friends and I were going to watch from a suite, which would make it a memorable night for more than one reason.   I woke up to a beautiful sunny, lazy Saturday morning to take my dog, Cooper, out for a walk. I noticed that the same feeling in my elbow from the day before seemed to have migrated to both hands. As we walked around the community, the same sensation seemed to radiate up my legs from my feet, leaving me feeling a bit unsteady. I jumped in the shower, and the numbness and tingling seemed to wrap around my entire torso. Immediately, my inner monologue shouted: MS...

Stepping Out

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When former Air Force Captain Karla Clay was diagnosed with MS in 2001, she felt her life came to a halt. ​ We talked with Karla about her MS journey, and how the upcoming 40th National Veteran Wheelchair Games has helped her find a community, and ultimately, a sense of purpose...

To Tell, or Not to Tell?

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As MS warriors, most of us at one time or another have been faced with a crucial question: To tell, or not to tell? Deciding to tell someone about your diagnosis is a difficult decision because it’s so personal. Also, your choice can vary depending on the person asking, the situation, or even how you’re feeling that particular day...