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  • sopuli
    Two weeks ago I woke up at night to use the bedroom and when I got out of bed I fell because my left gave out. It took maybe 15-20 seconds before I could get up, and went to the bathroom with the help of the wall. I wasn't sleeping on my leg weird or anything like that, it just gave out. Every since then, my left leg has had a weird sensation. I don't really know how to describe the feeling. I guess it tingles, sometimes feel like it's going to give out but never does. It's not constant, but can be pretty often and sometimes it feels quite overwhelming and annoying. I also have a burning sensation in my left leg on occasion as well. However, the sensation have now finally gone down and are only occasionally and slight.

    I asked advice from a nurse last Friday and she told me to go to urgent care immediate (she was worried that I may have had a stroke, which I didn't), which I did. A head CT was done, which found "on the right near the posterior part of the lateral ventricle, a fluid density thinning of approximately 5 mm" (sorry if this sounds weird, it's translated from Finnish). As a result, I was admitted to the neurology department for further testing. The neurologist wanted to to an MRI, stating that MS could be a possibility giving my age (31, female) but not necessarily. Neurological function tests were also done and normal, and the MRI was done on Monday (the referral stated demyelination? other possible pathologies?). The radiologists report states:
    Quote:
    There are a few signal abnormalities in the area of the brain that are consistent with loose perivascular spaces (one of which was also seen in the CT scan). No suspicious signal changes are detected. No contrast enhancers. Liquid spaces are of normal size.
    The neurologist conclusion was that the abnormalities seen in the images are just "benign perivascular spaces".
    Quote:
    The symptom is indicative of benignity, no obvious cause for the patient's sensory disorder now appears. Usually the sensory disorder settles with time. The patient may remain with the sensation. However, if loss of strength occurs in addition to sensory disturbances, seek emergency medical attention.

    Anyway, the neurologist told me when I first saw him that me sensations sound like they come from the spinal cord level, so I was wondering if maybe he should have done a spinal cord MRI as well?

    (Also, when I was in the hospital Friday night, I woke up to an electrical shock sensation throughout my body. I was sleeping with my arms above my head and the sensation traveled from my arms down through my body, ending at the feet. Should I have mentioned this to the neurologist? I mean to, but forgot. I was also a bit scared to because maybe it was just the result of me not sleeping well in the hospital and I didn't want him to think I was crazy. It was a really strong sensation. There also past symptoms that I didn't mention that may have been relevant.)
  • MS_Navigators
    Hi sopuli,

    To answer regarding the spinal MRI- it may be a good idea to have that checked out.  MS can impact areas within the entire central nervous system, which includes the brain, optic nerves and spinal cord, so it may be worth taking a look and either ruling it out, or taking the next steps towards figuring out what you'r experiencing.

    Jess, MS Navigator
  • sopuli
    MS_Navigators wrote: Hi sopuli,

    To answer regarding the spinal MRI- it may be a good idea to have that checked out.  MS can impact areas within the entire central nervous system, which includes the brain, optic nerves and spinal cord, so it may be worth taking a look and either ruling it out, or taking the next steps towards figuring out what you'r experiencing.

    Jess, MS Navigator

    Hi Jess!

    That's why I was wondering why the neurologist didn't do a spinal MRI. I know that MS can present with spinal lesions only and he said the symptoms were from that level, so I'm kind of disappointed he didn't look into. I'm not really sure how to ask for a spinal MRI, and to be honest, I don't think he would refer me for one.
     
  • MS_Navigators
    Hi sopuli,

    You may want to have that discussion with your neurologist and see what they say. Our self advocacy worksheet may help as you prepare for the conversation.

    If you would like to get a second opinion you can use our Find Doctors and Resources tool to search for another neurologist in your area.

    Best,
    MS Navigator, Stephanie 
  • sopuli
    So I ended up getting an appointment with a neurologist for Tuesday at a private health care center. I don't really know what to expect as my symptoms have lessened, but hopefully I can get a better idea of what caused my symptoms and maybe get the neurologist to refer me for an MRI of my spinal cord. I also plan on mentioning that I may have experienced Lhermitte's sign while in the hospital (which I forgot to tell the hospital neurologist) and maybe mention some random symptoms I've had in the past that may or may not be related (such as a "lazy" left leg/foot about year ago - there were many times where I closed doors at work on it and I occasionally hit it/tripped on stools that should have been easily been avoidable).