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  • ladyblue685

    I received this book as well and would also be interested in knowing the basics about thd diet.

  • kateryna_s

    Yes, I tried it and it's amazing. Have been on Wahls protocol for 2 years and most of my symptoms are gone. 

  • tern

    i have scanned it, seen her on ted talks and videos. i think it is a bit much but i follow some guidelines which i was doing before hearing of her diet. i eat gluten free, dairy free (except goat milk), caffeine free and low sugar. i recently started making green smoothies which she recomments. for spasticity t use coconut oil, internally and externally, which helps.

  • JN917

    I was gluten free for 11 years before I received a diagnosis of MS this year.  It is clear to me that being strict in my adherance to a gluten free diet really delayed the severity and complexity of the MS related symptoms (I had several un-diagnosed exacerbations prior to going gluten free in 2002).  Changing my diet back then was life-changing and transformative.  I recently began the Wahls Protocol in March of this year and once again, I have experienced life-changing transformation for the better.  The Wahls Protocol provides a valuable framework for the healing and restoration of my mitochondria and it guides my daily eating as I maintain a daily log/diary.  I feel amazing yet again!  I don't cheat and I don't miss anything really b/c when I accidentally consume something that is not part of the Wahls protocol or even something that my body reacts to, I can't function.  My walking is compromised, I can't focus and I feel awful.  But then, the symptoms dissapate as the reaction wears off and I can regain my footing.  I have chosen to sacrifice the pleasures of processed food and receive the benefit of whole foods and preparing my and my family's food.  It has been one of the absolute best life decisions I have ever had the privilege of making.

  • Wine-Maker

    I have not read the book you referred to, but I know, for myself, going gluten-free changed my life. I had bowel problems for years, while I thought I was eating healthy - lots of whole grains. Without going inti details of my problems, I can only tell you what I told my neurologist  - I have the happiest bowel I have had in many, many years. 

  • Wine-Maker

    While I am totally in favor of a gluten-free diet, it did nothing to stop my spasticity. I have been gluten-free for five years. The diet did nothing to stop spasticity. At this point I rely on botox shots.

  • pfarina23

    I have the book and have cut out gluten and dairy (for a while).  I have bought into her book earrings lots of fruits and veggies.  It's one of the things that can't hurt but only help!

  • Larry_Hall

    Only if your allergic to it. Otherwise cutting it from your diet dosnt really make a difference. 

    You could always try it for a few months to see if it helps. You never know, everyone's body is so different. 

  • Larry_Hall
    Only if your allergic to it. Otherwise cutting it from your diet dosnt really make a difference. 
     
    You could always try it for a few months to see if it helps. You never know, everyone's body is so different. 
  • eduggins1913

    I've started to read it, but am only on Chapter 3.  From the testimonials scattered throughout, it seems like it is working for some people at least.

  • Enrique
    travisgreen wrote: I've been dealing with a new symptom lately(spasticity) and it's got me changing a number of things and one being diet. My wife gave me the book "the Wahls Protocol" which seems to suggest a no gluten diet.... Has anyone else read this? And if so how's it working?


  • Enrique
    Yeah is really good but if that doesn't works or if you feel is not working after several months try candida diet and read the book healing multiple sclerosis by Ann Boroch
  • megatari
    The Wahls diet starts out gluten free but then transitions you to a Paleo/ketogenic diet. I am Paleo and have had amazing improvements. My biggest improvement though was from cutting out nightshade vegetables, which Wahls does not include as a suggestion. If you want more information google Autoimmune Protocol, Paleo Mom or the Paleo Approach. I really enjoyed these more than Dr. Wahls approach.
  • nimbus1961

    i have the book and a couple of people from my ms meet  group have done this and feel better and have more energy !

  • christinerlb

    Since being diagnosed my fiance's doctor told him to go gluten free, dairy free, and red meat free.  This has allowed to him to lose over 50 pounds within 4 months and has made a world of the difference in how he feels.  He also now takes Metanx, daily multivitamin, Vitamin D, and fish oil.  We are reading the Wahls Protocol now, she has an amazing Ted Talk about her experience, and all the additional reading we have done suggest a Paleo Diet.  The doctor has said he is doing so well that he might be able to lower the dosage of Rebif and eventually go off of it because he is sticking to the diet so well.  I highly recommend giving this a try it has given us such a great quality of life.  

  • christinerlb

    And by no means is it easy to do the no gluten, dairy, or red meat nor is it cheap.  But what has really helped us is meal planning and having a constant supply of our go to meals in the fridge.  HE is just beyond disciplined with it because he sees this as a step in the right direction to live a longer healthier life for our family.  

  • MS_Navigators

    christinerlb wrote:

    Since being diagnosed my fiance's doctor told him to go gluten free, dairy free, and red meat free.  This has allowed to him to lose over 50 pounds within 4 months and has made a world of the difference in how he feels.  He also now takes Metanx, daily multivitamin, Vitamin D, and fish oil.  We are reading the Wahls Protocol now, she has an amazing Ted Talk about her experience, and all the additional reading we have done suggest a Paleo Diet.  The doctor has said he is doing so well that he might be able to lower the dosage of Rebif and eventually go off of it because he is sticking to the diet so well.  I highly recommend giving this a try it has given us such a great quality of life.  

     

    Ellen Mowry, MD:

    One thing that is fairly common when people receive a new diagnosis, is to make a lot of changes at the same time. Your fiancé made three major dietary changes, started four supplements, and started Rebif all at the same time. So, it’s hard to know if all of those particular changes had an impact on his MS. If he had tried two of the modifications would that be better or worse? Maybe it is the gluten-free diet that’s helping him the most? Or maybe it’s actually the Rebif? The goal of Rebif and other disease modifying therapies is to slow down or stop progression, in which case you may see fewer symptoms. While the decision to reduce or terminate a therapy needs to be made by a patient and his or her doctor, you could argue that the Rebif itself may have been a big contributor to his improved health.

    It could be that your fiancé’s weight loss is impacting the functioning of his immune system, if he was overweight prior to starting the diet. Recent studies looking at body mass index – a measure of carrying enough, not enough or too much weight – have demonstrated that children or adolescents who are overweight or obese have an increased risk of developing MS. The fat that we carry in our bodies produces a lot of hormones. It makes chemicals that can increase inflammation and impact the immune system. So, fat itself may be an active contributor to the functioning of the immune system in someone whose immune systems isn’t working correctly, perhaps making some of these chemicals or hormones and revving up the immune system in a bad way.

    With respect to each of these diets or any of the supplements, there really are very limited data to support any one of them as a definite helper for people with MS. There have been only very small studies of removing gluten from the diet. There has been one observational study – meaning it wasn’t randomized – looking at people who went on a gluten-free diet and they didn’t see any link between the diet and changing MS activity. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it won’t be helpful – it just means we need more research. 

    Unfortunately, the same is true for dairy and red meat: there really just aren’t great data. This answer can be frustrating – and it can be tempting to take matters into your own hands when food and supplements are readily available. However, it’s important to consider that anything you put into your body with the intention of changing your disease or your health is being used like a medication. And so, the same way that approved MS medications have to go through a rigorous research process, including clinical trials, so should diets and supplements. If something has the potential to impact your disease in a positive manner, it also has the potential to do harm.  We owe it to people with MS to study promising diet changes or promising supplements really carefully to make sure that when we make recommendations, we’re not contributing to the worsening of the disease.

    Denise Nowack, RD:

    If you’re concerned about your weight, it’s also important to look at what may be contributing to weight gain or inability to lose weight. Is your diet a contributor? And are your symptoms contributors? Depression can contribute to being overweight. Mobility and activity limitations can contribute to being overweight. Fatigue can be a contributor to being overweight. So just look at where symptoms may play a role and ask the question: when you experience this, how does this impact that way you eat? When you’re tired, what gets in your way of eating well?

    A Word About Gluten…

    Gluten is the protein component of wheat, rye and barley. Most of us have the ability to easily digest this protein. However in people who may be genetically vulnerable, the protein (gluten) creates an autoimmune reaction resulting in a condition called Celiac Disease. This triggers the body to attack itself inflaming and ultimately destroying the microvilli of the small intestine. Typical symptoms of true celiac disease include chronic diarrhea, fatigue, malabsorption that can lead to risk of osteoporosis due to non-absorption of calcium. This affects about 1% of the population.

    Gluten Sensitivity is believed to be a separate non‐immune mediated condition that has similar but less severe symptoms. In gluten sensitivity gluten is an irritant and the body acts to repel this irritant, but does not attack its own tissue. Some people only have a response to wheat but not all grains and that could relate back to an allergic reaction to just wheat.

    Scientific studies have shown that celiac disease occurs much more frequently in people with MS than in the general population, leading to speculation that a gluten‐free diet might help relieve MS symptoms. This may be true for those who are truly gluten intolerant, but not the MS population in general. If you are allergic to gluten grains, you will know for sure by observation and testing. Maintaining a detailed nutritional notebook is a great starting tool.
     

  • Debrina
    christinerlb wrote:

    Since being diagnosed my fiance's doctor told him to go gluten free, dairy free, and red meat free.  This has allowed to him to lose over 50 pounds within 4 months and has made a world of the difference in how he feels.  He also now takes Metanx, daily multivitamin, Vitamin D, and fish oil.  We are reading the Wahls Protocol now, she has an amazing Ted Talk about her experience, and all the additional reading we have done suggest a Paleo Diet.  The doctor has said he is doing so well that he might be able to lower the dosage of Rebif and eventually go off of it because he is sticking to the diet so well.  I highly recommend giving this a try it has given us such a great quality of life.  



  • Debrina
    Hi, Did you read a book or how did you educate yourself about going Gluten free? I have thought about it and after reading about the weight loss I'm real eager to try it :)
  • nicseiler

    When I was diagnosed with MS, I was following a fairly strict vegan diet. Before I began following my vegan diet, I was very strict vegetarian. So with that said, no matter how healthy I ate, I was still diagnosed with MS. I still believe in the health benefits of a plant based diet, whether one has MS or not. At this point I am not strict vegan, but still eat no meat products, except for some dairy and eggs. 

    I do prefer to focus on eating plant proteins (nuts, legumes, quinoa, soy) and various fruits and vegetables. I feel better when I get more of that in my diet than when I eat lots of carbs and dairy/eggs.  

    What's most important is to eat a balanced diet which is full of macronutrients that fits into your lifestyle and finances. I do understand that it is expensive to eat healthy, so one has to do the best they can.