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  • Kelly1869

    sounds great!  I also have been eating vegetarian/vegan diet.  I had gone vegetarian 20 years ago. I was diagnosed with MS 13 years ago.  These days eating vegan is easy.  Plant protiens all over.  :)

     

  • emilylanmoore

    My doctor said that I should watch my sodium intake, but did not give any specifics.  How much sodium intake would you recommend for an MS patient?  Should I follow the American Heart Association guidelines?  Thank you!

  • MS_Navigators

    emilylanmoore wrote:

    My doctor said that I should watch my sodium intake, but did not give any specifics.  How much sodium intake would you recommend for an MS patient?  Should I follow the American Heart Association guidelines?  Thank you!

     

    Ellen Mowry, MD:

    There was an interesting recent study about salt in the mouse version of multiple sclerosis. (It’s important to state that findings from the mouse type of MS don’t always translate to humans.) In this particular study, they fed mice a high salt diet, and found that those mice were at increased risk of developing the mouse type of MS and that the disease was more severe. That said, the data in humans are pretty limited at this point. Early studies are starting to look at this in people with MS. Hopefully we’ll know more in the near future.

    Anyone who wants to modify salt intake on his or her own should first talk to their primary care provider. Salt has a lot of implications for other diseases like kidney disease, heart disease, and high blood pressure. Unfortunately, there isn’t a one size fits all recommendation for the global MS community.

    Denise Nowack, RD:

    If you’re trying to control your sodium intake understand that one-third of the sodium in our foods mother nature puts there, the other two-thirds we add ourselves or manufactures add to the foods we eat. Be aware that processed foods can be higher in sodium and salt. Buy low-sodium versions of canned tomato sauce or tomatoes, as well as broths and stocks. I buy packaged grain products that are easy and quick to cook, but I might leave the seasoning packet out or use only half of it.


     

  • refusetoquit

    Emily, your question on 'how much sodium'............keep in mind 'inflamation' is the main cause of many symptom's of disease.......salt is a big culprit. American's have gotten too used to salt..... the joke in our house is mom, my caregiver and cook, asking me........EVERY SUPPER, "do you want buttter or salt on your veggies"? She ALWAY'S want's to add them..............every once in a while I surprise her and say 'yes'. Of COURSE it taste's better..............BUT it causes havoc with inflamation. Other than YOU preparing meal's.......whole food's, ALL fast ood, pre-packaged food has too much salt..............not to mention chemical's.

    It would be pretty hard to 'not get enough'.............consider everything you put in your mouth 'high in salt'. Wish there was THE answer.........

  • amb2288
    I've heard that the paleo diet can inhibit symptoms of autoimmune disorders including MS. There is so much research published arguing different points and I believe that a decent portion of the disease is individually based, however if the paleo diet can antagonize the MS process I would be willing to try it out! :)
  • riella84

    After being diagnosed back in 2012, I read a lot of articles and books that suggested giving up foods that you are intolerant to so decided to get tested and found I was highly intolerant to eggs, dairy and gluten. I have since given it up and the difference in my symptoms were amazing. I have had hardly any new symptoms or relapses. There have been instances when I do break my strict regime and my symptoms return within days!!  For me, following that strict regime has made a massive difference in my MS progression.  I've had an MRI scan recently and was told there are no new legions which was probably the best news I've heard in a long time.

  • maria1

    Ma, my stomach hurts.

    Are your bowels pen?

    Ma, my head hurts.

    Are your bowels open?

    Ma, I  scraped my knee.

    Are your bowels open?

    lol. As important as nutrition is, evacuating waste is what no one speaks to. Removing poisons from the body should be the forefront of good nutrition. Anything injested that impedes expelling toxins should be avoided. You all know what is least appealing to your own individual plumbing, let that be the first advance to a healthy diet. The brain needs plenty of oxygen, so if you drink a cup of coffee it is said you ought drink two cups of water to replace the oxygen the coffee depletes.

    Sometimes comfort foods ease the strain of living with ms and gives us a feeling of our old selves, if that is what is emotionally needed at the time, allowing the indulgence is good karma. Probiotics ought be considered to replace or maintain all that good flora in the gut, yogurt just won't cut it.

  • Eric7

    maria1 wrote:

    Ma, my stomach hurts.

    Are your bowels pen?

    Ma, my head hurts.

    Are your bowels open?

    Ma, I  scraped my knee.

    Are your bowels open?

    lol. As important as nutrition is, evacuating waste is what no one speaks to. Removing poisons from the body should be the forefront of good nutrition. Anything injested that impedes expelling toxins should be avoided. You all know what is least appealing to your own individual plumbing, let that be the first advance to a healthy diet. The brain needs plenty of oxygen, so if you drink a cup of coffee it is said you ought drink two cups of water to replace the oxygen the coffee depletes.

    Sometimes comfort foods ease the strain of living with ms and gives us a feeling of our old selves, if that is what is emotionally needed at the time, allowing the indulgence is good karma. Probiotics ought be considered to replace or maintain all that good flora in the gut, yogurt just won't cut it.


     

  • Eric7

    maria1 wrote:

    Ma, my stomach hurts.

    Are your bowels pen?

    Ma, my head hurts.

    Are your bowels open?

    Ma, I  scraped my knee.

    Are your bowels open?

    lol. As important as nutrition is, evacuating waste is what no one speaks to. Removing poisons from the body should be the forefront of good nutrition. Anything injested that impedes expelling toxins should be avoided. You all know what is least appealing to your own individual plumbing, let that be the first advance to a healthy diet. The brain needs plenty of oxygen, so if you drink a cup of coffee it is said you ought drink two cups of water to replace the oxygen the coffee depletes.

    Sometimes comfort foods ease the strain of living with ms and gives us a feeling of our old selves, if that is what is emotionally needed at the time, allowing the indulgence is good karma. Probiotics ought be considered to replace or maintain all that good flora in the gut, yogurt just won't cut it.

    I couldn't agree with you more regarding "evacuting waste"...you're the first I've heard (other than me) refer to the importance of this process (first and foremost)
     

  • clparker13
    I agree. I was diagnosed in 2007, age 25. I started taking a cleanse supplement recently and it's amazing. Foreverspx.com. It's the SPX Nutrition Cleanse.
  • naneus
    I have been a vegetarian for 21 years and exercise regularly. My neurologist is very impressed with how well I am doing after 20 years with MS.
  • Barb-A-
    Sticking to any one "diet" can be challenging if you expect to live and enjoy in the real world. I've had MS since 2006 and it was suggested to me in 2007 that I follow an anti-inflammatory way of eating. Since my business and passion are wellness, I knew this not to mean deprivation of foods I love. It meant moderation. So I follow a Mediterranean way of eating - lots of fresh veggies, fruits with limited dairy and grains. I've switch to diary, meat, fish, chicken and eggs that are hormone/antibiotic-free. I also take fish oil supplements (even though I eat a lot of fish) and vitamin D. My CRP (C-reactive protein level that measures blood inflammation - lower = better) has dropped from 6.8 to 3.4 over the years even though my weight has remained the same (it'd be nice to drop 20 lbs). My primary focus is being healthy & fit. So far...so good!
  • aldarby27

    Hi Everyone,

     

    Happy Friday!!!

     

    I have read the research findings from Dr Roy Swank's study on the effects of diet and the course of MS and have followed his diet for the past 3 years - it's a pescatarian diet so no meat or dairy but plenty of oily fish, fruit and vegetables.  I am a firm believer in his research findings and get frustrated when Doctors say there is not enough evidence to support any diet in relation to it's impact on the course of MS - I advise you  to do your own research and take a look at Roy swank's fingings - they are overwhelming.

     

    That's my two cents ;-)

    Alex

  • kathyus

    I am so happy to see this discussion.  I, too, read Swank's research and then found the book "Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis" by George Jelinek.  The research it is based on spans decades.  I switched over about 1 1/2 years ago and wouldn't go back to my old way of eating even if they found a cure for MS.  

  • kellyu

    I respectfully have to question the old standby advice of eating whole grains and lowfat dairy.  Recent research suggests that wheat is inflammatory and it is accepted knowledge that dairy is immunogenic and should NOT be advised to people with multiple sclerosis.  Read Grain Brain and Wheat Belly, then google dairy+multiple sclerosis and decide for yourself.

  • KSMargeson
    I believe diet has had a major impact on improving my MS. I've had it (and been diagnosed) for 9.5 years. I have been on treatment the whole time. For the first 4 years, I had relapses every 3-5 months. Then I cleaned up my diet significantly, and in the last 4.5 years only have relapses every 8-14 months or so. Here's the changes I made: First I became vegan (no eggs, no dairy, no meat). I did this with an emphasis on real foods and veggies, not a lot of processed or fake meats n cheeses. This definitely seemed to help. I kept that diet up for 4 years. Recently, in the last year and a half, I've added animal protein back in, but only very carefully sourced (grass fed beef, wild caught fish, always organic). I still never eat eggs or dairy. I keep my consumption of wheat (bread, pasta, etc.) very low and processed foods very low - both are treats only. My MS seems to still be doing well. I've just marked my first ever year without a relapse. I do also exercise and keep very fit which seems to help. My neurologist says specific diets don't do anything, but this has been a big change in my course of the disease.
  • drdebig

    I have been living with my diagniosis fo the last 29/30 years I am a Swank friendly Doctor I believe the Swank diet has been my reason for my prognosis being so good.  I wrote an article many years ago about How I treat my MS.  www.grecomd.com please read I have been able to help many and motivate each of my patients with the correct food and choice it is all about the fats good ones. and oils in the day.  My hope for all is to keep moving stay away from toxic people and sitiuations.  Whether it is MS or another condition smile dance even if it is in place.  Be happy!  Please freel free to ask me questions and visit www.danburynutrition.com.  I want to help all who wants the help.

  • ebolduc
    If you compare the Swank diet, the GAPS and the Paleo they are similar in that they suggest plenty of fresh vegetables and some fruits in the diet with limited grains or gluten. When trying to figure out how each of these might work best for each individual, most books do not explain or even bring up the genetic mutations such as the MTHFR mutations which is found in about 30 percent of the population and causes the body to not break down some nutrients such folic acid. my body has always had is very difficult time detoxing and thus I was diagnosed with MS 6 years ago but I have been dealing with endometriosis and other things for over20 years. The Mthfr genes code for enzymes that help with the methylation process in the body. There are inexpensive dna tests to check for these so that you aren't flying blind trying to figure out the best diet for you. Everyone is unique. I eat mostly organic since my body can't handle any more toxins building up and in the long run is the cheapest health care for me. Allergic reaction to GMOs is also a good reason to eat organic and gluten free.
  • clparker13

    I am 32 years old and was diagnosed with MS at age 25.  I have been back and forth with good diet and exercise throughout these years.  Just recently I have made up my mind to change my lifestyle habits.  I joined a gym.  My energy is not at all the greatest.  

    A personal trainer introduced me to SPX Nutrition which helps immensely. I researched all the ingredients and everything is legit.  I highly recommend the NutriThin and SeaVeg.

    www.foreverspx.com

  • eunicebediako

    Hi Everyone, I have been diagnosed for only a year and have tried it all from Gluten Free, to only eating fruits and vegetables. Nothing can has changed but made more tired and weak. Can I get any suggestions or ideas.

     

    Thanks,

    Eunice Bediako