Search Discussions

Main Content

  • MS_Navigators

    Though still controversial — and not wholly understood — cannabis has gained some scientific support for use in MS — but only for certain symptoms and only in certain forms. Join us for a conversation about marijuana and MS. Share your thoughts and questions below. Read the Momentum Magazine article and check back later this month as we discuss this topic with two leading researchers, Dr. Robert Fox and Dr. John DeLuca.

  • drdoevenless

    I think marijuana would likely be of benefit for decreasing spasticity and to help with relaxation. Forgetting isn't always a bad thing either. I would like to think if my partner who has MS wanted to use it, it wouldn't be a considered a crime.

  • Floridagirl79
    I truly think if it is proven that medical marijuana can be useful to people that need it, than it should not be a big deal. I'm just curious if I were to use medical marijuana; do I still continue my treatments? I would venture to say yes because it would only be used on my absolute worst days.
  • Avatar
    I am not a doctor but have lived with MS for 15 years. Medical Marijuana does not reduce flares or slow progression of the disease so prescribed therapy should continue to be used.
  • jpalmer8473

    That is when I use it on my really bad days and it would help. If during a day I needed to use my cane I would smoke and the next day my legs would feel sooo much better.

  • new2ms101

    Floridagirl79 wrote: I truly think if it is proven that medical marijuana can be useful to people that need it, than it should not be a big deal. I'm just curious if I were to use medical marijuana; do I still continue my treatments? I would venture to say yes because it would only be used on my absolute worst days.

     

    Yes, follow your Dr. advice.  But you may find after researching High CBD / Cannabidiol , that you may not even need any DMT's.

    PLUS! You, like me live in FL.  SB1030 legalized High CBD Low THC last July. 

    NOW!  Vote Yes on 2, at the poll's November 4th!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  To legalize MMJ for us and other patient's w/ cancer, ALS, PTSD...you name the disease, the cannabis plant has a medicine for it.

    Jen (aka New2ms101)

  • Tammy29

    Yes you continue your treatment.  Marijuana is simply another drug to add to your disease management list.  For me, it helps alleviate spasticity (better than baclofen) and decreases how often I must resort to pain meds.

  • maureen-k-russell

    I am interested in the recommended ways to use medical mj that isn't also detrimental to one's health. How can anything smoked be a good idea for MS patients? Would the reseachers promote one method over another?

  • jpalmer8473

    I dont know if smoking affects you but I found that either smoking a joint or through a hookah it works really good. brownies worked for me to but they take anywhere from 1-2 hours to kick in so if you're in a lot of pain and want to be out instantly smoking would be best. 

  • Tammy29

    If you use a vaporizer you can eliminate the tar from smoking.  I find it improves my spasticity as well as decreasing how often I need pain meds.

  • jcpacini
    I am a medical cannabis user. It helps with a variety of my symptoms, from pain to spasticity to sleep to appetite. I smoke because I can control the dosage better than I can with edibles. The U.S. Government still insists that there are no medicinal benefits from cannabis and provide very few research grants to study cannabis' benefits and issues. Big pharma does not want to study it because there is no profit for them. Yet for tens of thousands (at least) of years, humans have been using cannabis to treat a amazing array of ailments. Mother Nature supplied a treatment option with very few "harmful" side effects.
  • Jenninha
    I agree, thank you. :)
    jcpacini wrote: I am a medical cannabis user. It helps with a variety of my symptoms, from pain to spasticity to sleep to appetite. I smoke because I can control the dosage better than I can with edibles. The U.S. Government still insists that there are no medicinal benefits from cannabis and provide very few research grants to study cannabis' benefits and issues. Big pharma does not want to study it because there is no profit for them. Yet for tens of thousands (at least) of years, humans have been using cannabis to treat a amazing array of ailments. Mother Nature supplied a treatment option with very few "harmful" side effects.


  • Jenninha
    jcpacini wrote: I am a medical cannabis user. It helps with a variety of my symptoms, from pain to spasticity to sleep to appetite. I smoke because I can control the dosage better than I can with edibles. The U.S. Government still insists that there are no medicinal benefits from cannabis and provide very few research grants to study cannabis' benefits and issues. Big pharma does not want to study it because there is no profit for them. Yet for tens of thousands (at least) of years, humans have been using cannabis to treat a amazing array of ailments. Mother Nature supplied a treatment option with very few "harmful" side effects.


  • Mark64

     Dr. Fox diagnosed me with Primary Progressive MS in 2001. I was placed in a case study for Mitoxantrone and have not taken any MS modifying medicine since, I do take some RX for symptoms mainly for spasticity, fatigue and pain and recently just started on tecfidera. My question is how would marijuana interact with my current medicine? I take Hydrocodine for pain and would prefer to use something “natural” compared to an additive narcotic medicine. I have tried marijuana and it does seem to calm my nerve pain but worried about the interaction. Thank You

  • Avatar
    You should communicate with your doctor and not rely on any suggestions or opinions of participants in this conversations. It is important for support and peace of mind to have discussions like this one but your doctors are your first and best resource.
  • melbran

    Mark64 wrote:

     Dr. Fox diagnosed me with Primary Progressive MS in 2001. I was placed in a case study for Mitoxantrone and have not taken any MS modifying medicine since, I do take some RX for symptoms mainly for spasticity, fatigue and pain and recently just started on tecfidera. My question is how would marijuana interact with my current medicine? I take Hydrocodine for pain and would prefer to use something “natural” compared to an additive narcotic medicine. I have tried marijuana and it does seem to calm my nerve pain but worried about the interaction. Thank You


    Thanks Mark, I was diagnosed in 1989, have been on many different MS med. now on Tecfidara, still take others meds as you do also. I was wondering about that too. I am a 70s girl and seem to have the same effect. I would rather skip the medication and use a natural means to help.

  • new2ms101

    Mark64 wrote:

     Dr. Fox diagnosed me with Primary Progressive MS in 2001. I was placed in a case study for Mitoxantrone and have not taken any MS modifying medicine since, I do take some RX for symptoms mainly for spasticity, fatigue and pain and recently just started on tecfidera. My question is how would marijuana interact with my current medicine? I take Hydrocodine for pain and would prefer to use something “natural” compared to an additive narcotic medicine. I have tried marijuana and it does seem to calm my nerve pain but worried about the interaction. Thank You

    Mark64, here is a site where you can type in the drug you are concerned about interacting w/ cannabis. I highky doubt that cannabis interact's w/ any "man-made" "synthetic" drug.  Maybe it would cause more drowsiness at the least.

    I take high CBD cannabis oil for it's neurological protection.  If the THC is too high, it causes more pain for me, so I take my prescribed hydrocodone and flexeril to combat pain.  BUT I would be taking the prescribed medication anyway. 

    Nothing bad has ever happened to me combining cannabis w/ other medications.  If anything I take less prescribed pain medication!  I am not on any MS DMT's, just Cannabidiol, so if you take any of those chemotherapy drugs you might want to research them here: http://www.drugs.com/drug-interations/cannabis.html
     

  • izzie

    very interesting,,,,,,i would love to heE MORE but this topic:)

  • cerasaur
    I am fully and completely in support of this. Also having spinal cord injury and living somewhere that it is legal, I have access to much more information on the subject. It's important to understand that the effects can (and most likely should) be enjoyed without smoking, and even without getting high. There are a variety of compounds aside from THC found in medical cannabis such as CBD and CBG, and those are the ones that help with spasticity, pain, sleep, and encouraging appetite.
     
    I would fully suggest this video to anyone looking to learn a little bit more. 
     
    This is a speech by a doctor who has many years treating ALS using medical cannabis, and discussing this in regards to spinal cord injuries. SCI has many of the same symptoms as MS (which I was diagnosed a decent amount of time and had for more than ten years before being injured) such as spasticity and chronic pain. Now, this is obviously a little bit counter to the fatigue that is common in MS, but it is important to know that different strains can be developed and the different compounds can be derived to find what is useful (and eliminate what is not)l
     
    I myself have found, having a spinal cord injury that results in pain and spasticity, that a variety of these compounds work better for managing pain and spasticity than medications. It seems to increase the efficacy of other medications such as oxycodone as well. Since I have recently had MRIs with no new activity after being on Copaxone for more than a year and also incorporating cannabis, I cannot see it affecting the impact of my other medications - it doesn't seem to react in any negative ways, though this is certainly something that needs more research.
  • loveisjoy

    My spasticity is so bad that the next step is to implant a baclofen pump (something I'm desperately trying to avoid)  I've been reading that cannabis is particularly effective for management of spasticity and painful neuropathy (which I also have)  My questions are: how will it interact with my current meds; is it used as an adjunct or a replacement?  Are there any studies to guide patients on dosages and drug interactions or will we be acting as our own guinea pigs?

    Additionally, I'm curious as to the effects to the lungs of smoking marijuana.  I've never smoked in my life and would not want to start now.  Has there been any studies or information about the efficacies of delivery systems other than smoking?